Joint Custody Initiative Building Momentum

It might come as a surprise to many Vermonters, but we are one of the only states left in the country in which judges do NOT have the right to grant joint custody of children in divorce proceedings unless BOTH parents ask for it. As a result, judges are forced to make Solomon-like decisions by […]

Eliza’a Wellness Pearls – Say No! to a Summer Filled with Screen Time

(Editor’s Note:  I am very pleased to begin a new series of posts by our clinic’s family coach and social worker, Eliza Pillard, entitled “Eliza’s Wellness Pearls,” featuring tips for child wellness and health promotion.  Stay tuned for more posts in the future and please feel free to suggest topics – DR) March is the […]

The Family Dinner

(Editor’s note:  I am very pleased to present a new posting written by one of our third year psychiatry residents, Dr. David DeVellis. -  DR) by David DeVellis, MD How often do you find yourself saying “I’d do fill in the blank if I only had more time”?  Exercise, sleep, and eating well–all vital for […]

Talking with Children About the Connecticut School Shootings

All over the country people are horrified at the shootings that happened at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Our hearts go out to all the families affected by this tragedy.  While many facts of the shooting remain to be learned, tonight millions of parents will do their best to try and talk to their children about what happened.  […]

Tags: , ,

Genes for Responsiveness to Parenting Practices?

In classic models of psychiatric risk, particular child characteristics are seen as generally negative things that under the wrong conditions can get amplified  into full-fledged psychiatric disorders.  A newer model, however, holds that some of these characteristics are better understood as related to environmental sensitivity, which means that in positive environments these same traits may convey an actual developmental advantage. A […]

Tags: , ,

Can Pacifiers Stunt Emotional Growth?

The debate about pacifiers as useful aides to soothe crying infants versus developmentally stunting crutches has been with us for decades. This group of researchers from the University of Wisconsin and elsewhere set out to test the possibility that pacifier use was associated with a delay in emotional development. Their hypothesis was that increased pacifier […]

Tags: , , ,

Let them Cry? Pick them Up? Does it Matter?

The practice of letting infants cry it out on their own when they wake up at night versus picking them up and soothing them has been an ageless parenting dilemma, especially since sleep expert Ferber popularized his technique.   While there are many strong opinions on the subject, there is surprisingly little long-term data.  Approximately half […]

Tags: , , ,

Physical Punishment Linked to Increased Long-Term Mental Health Disorders

by David Harari (Editor Note – I am very pleased to have one of our UVM medical students, David Harari, contribute this well written piece on an important topic.  For those interested in learning more about corporal punishment, however, I suggest not doing an internet search on “spanking.”  You were warned – DCR) While it […]

Tags: , , ,

Helping Parents with Preschool Choices – Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and Waldorf

Parents have a number of options when it comes to daycare and preschool and can wind up anxious and confused trying to find the “right” one.  Primary care clinicians may be asked to weigh in on this important decision but themselves can be unfamiliar with the different approaches now available.  To help, here is a […]

Tags: , , ,

Tiger-Attachment-Ferberization Parenting

Time Magazine got lots of the attention it wanted with their recent cover (shown).  The photo, however, was much more provocative than the article that provided a fairly balanced view of Attachment Parenting and its main advocate, Dr. William Sears.   That’s not to say that the article won’t stir up confusion all over again among […]

Tags: , , ,