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I’ve created a new page for my trilogy of piano recordings, made between 2006 and sometime in the mid-2010s, which made use of the Yamaha Clavinova’s capacity for altering the piano’s tuning system away from the “equal temperament” westerners (and now the world) have gotten used to, and toward some more interesting sonic terrain. As […]

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In a week of startling developments, some things still sound like they’re from The Onion. Or at least Harper’s Findings. They aren’t. In a week of police riots capping decades of ethnic violence in a country torn asunder by authoritarianism, a dismal economy, and plague, police responding to a bee sting were attacked by a […]

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Pronoun statement

As more people attach pronouns to their names (“she/her,” “they, their,” et al.), both in print and when speaking — intended as a way of respecting and “normalizing” pronoun preferences beyond the simple binary of “he” and “she” — I’ve come to recognize a certain awkwardness in one of the common variations: the use of […]

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The Washington Post reports that “Ruthenium-106, named after Russia” has been wafting all across Europe. Two quick observations here.

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Kyїv, Ukraine

Since my review of urban geographer Roman Cybriwsky’s excellent book on Kyїv, Ukraine, has not been published yet by the journal I wrote it for, though a second edition has already come out, and since I’ll be visiting the city in a couple of days, I thought I might as well share that review, here. (I’ll […]

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Indiana sale

My book Claiming Sacred Ground is available for half price from the publisher, Indiana University Press, all this week. But then you can always get a copy from me for at least as good a deal as that, as I still have some kicking around at the office. (Here’s how it relates to my later work.)

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Glass half full…

Two news bits from the past week or so: (1) The UN has announced that the proportion of people who are chronically undernourished in the world has fallen by nearly half — from 23.3% to 12.9% — over the last 25 years. Only a handful of countries — Haiti, North Korea, Zambia, Namibia, and the Central African Republic […]

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Verbing the title

I just noticed, for the first time, how many of my publication titles begin with a verb in present continuous (or progressive) mode: words like claiming, stirring, stoking, opening, orchestrating, coloring, weathering, de/composing, re-examining, teaching… If I include subtitles, I get mapping, theorizing, stalking, collapsing, crafting. And when I add talk and conference paper titles, there’s screening, greening, […]

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Foucault quote quiz

Quick quiz: What U.S. city did Michel Foucault pen these words about?

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Visiting Antioch

I’ll be the guest speaker at the Environmental Studies colloquium at the Antioch University New England Graduate School tomorrow. Title of my talk: “Culturing Nature: Ecology, Gaia, and the Parliament of Lively Things.”

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Making the news

Since I’ve begun paying attention to web sites about the ongoing events in Ukraine, I’ve noticed how similar Russian web trolls are to climate denialist trolls. Both seem to operate on an industrial scale. Trolling is one way of fabricating news. Acting is another. Here are some priceless encounters with news fabrication.    

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The Media and Environment Scholarly Interest Group just won the prize for best attended business meeting at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Or so we were informed by the SCMS interest group liaison present at the meeting. This year’s SCMS featured what to my mind was by far the largest assemblage of panels and papers […]

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