Engaging with history in Ukraine

Posted in Uncategorized on August 15, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

Writing in The Nation, Jared McBride raises some important questions about the uses of (and control over) history in wartime Ukraine.

Marci Shore’s “Reading Tony Judt in Wartime Ukraine” indirectly, but provocatively, answers them.

Andrei Portnov’s “On Decommunization, Identity, and Legislating History, from a Slightly Different Angle” provides a balanced perspective on the same issues.

Link dump

Posted in Uncategorized on July 26, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

Links to various articles relevant to the topics explored on this blog (I may add to this list, so please check back periodically):

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/07/17/how-we-know-russia-shot-down-mh17.html

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2015/07/13/open-source-information-reveals-pro-kremlin-web-campaign/

http://voxukraine.org/2014/10/01/trust-and-prejudice/

http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/new-atlanticist/everything-you-thought-you-knew-about-right-wing-parties-is-wrong?utm_content=buffer0240a&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#.VXjEqPKHSh4.facebook

http://culture.lb.ua/news/2015/05/08/304258_filosofi_tsitiruet_putin_.html

https://www.opendemocracy.net/denis-gorbach/struggle-for-progressive-politics-in-ukraine

http://krytyka.com/en/articles/country-war-love-excerpts-donetsk-diary

http://rbth.com/opinion/2015/02/05/the_real_leviathan_43475.html

Nihilist vs. Kagarlitsky

Posted in Uncategorized on April 22, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

Russophone leftists Nihilist.li provide a “take-down” of prominent Russian left-wing intellectual Boris Kagarlitsky, translated here.  Kagarlitsky has been an influential voice on Western Left understandings of the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

Nihilist arose from the ashes of Left Affair (Liva Sprava).

Marples: On the “Fighters for Ukrainian Independence” Law

Posted in Uncategorized on April 10, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

David Marples provides an astute critique of the new parliamentary law “Concerning the legal status and commemorating the memory of the fighters for Ukrainian independence in the 20th century,” here.

Kroker & Weinstein: Maidan as third force

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on March 9, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

With their talk of supernovas, black holes, and event-horizons, Arthur Kroker and Michael Weinstein’s “Maidan, Caliphate, and Code: Theorizing Power and Resistance in the 21st Century” is not exactly social science in any recognizable form. Read as poetry, however, its rendition of the state of affairs in and between Ukraine and Russia is provocative and worth reading.

Read more »

“We do not need your support”

Posted in Uncategorized on February 15, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

This statement from December, a response by Ukrainian independent left groups to some western leftists’ (perceived) support for Russian aggression against Ukraine, deserves to be reprinted, as the attitudes it targets continue in some places.

Kowalewski: On the Donbas rebellion

Posted in Uncategorized on February 15, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

In “The Oligarchic Rebellion in the Donbas,” Polish socialist Zbigniew Kowalewski provides an astute analysis of the Donbas separatist movement as an oligarchic project of the regional capitalist elite.

The article can be read here.

A history of the crisis in maps

Posted in Uncategorized on February 12, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

The New York Times offers a history in maps of the Ukraine crisis, here.

 

McFinn on navigating the “arm Ukraine” debate

Posted in Uncategorized on February 12, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

Rory McFinn offers a handy set of guidelines for distinguishing Ukraine crisis commentators who don’t know much about Ukraine from those who do, here.

Motyl on fascism in Ukraine vs. Russia

Posted in Uncategorized on February 6, 2015 by Adrian J Ivakhiv

In “Is Ukraine fascist?” Rutgers University political scientist Alexander Motyl examines the case for finding fascism in Ukraine as opposed to Russia.

He’s pretty fair, despite his overstated conclusion. (I don’t think Russia has conclusively become fascist, even if many of the elements of that process are well in play.)

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