Join Us At Addison County Fair & Field Days! And…. bring your submission to our crops exhibit!

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Hey Folks, Addison County Fair and Field Days is coming up August 9 – 13th and we are looking forward to your entries. Help us show and tell the general public about the crops you grow and use your prize winnings on fair treats for the family!
 2016 ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & FIELD DAYS
Bring in your crop entries:

Monday, August 8, 2016 – 8 AM to 12 noon

FIELD CROPS ENTRY RULES
  1. A farm may have only one (1) entry in each class. All entries must be produced on the exhibitor’s farm.
  2. Bring exhibits to the 4-H Exhibit Building on Monday, August 8th between 8:00 AM and 12:00 noon-This is the only time to enter!
  3. Entries must be tagged using Field Days’ tags: grower name, farm name, address, class, & variety.
  4. Entries will be judged and awarded ribbons as follows: Excellent – Blue;   Good – Red;  Fair – White;
Rosettes for Best of Class and Best of Show.
  1. Premiums paid:          Blue – $15             Red – $10              White – $5
Best of Each Class – $25     Overall Best of Show – $50
CROP CLASSES
1.   Corn Plants – 3 whole plants with roots intact
2.   Soybean – 5 whole plants with roots intact
3.   Cereal Grains-Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rye – bundle
4.   Corn Silage – 1 Quart Jar
5.   Snaplage or ground ear corn – 1 Quart Jar
6.   Grass Haylage – 1 Quart Jar
7.   Legume Haylage- 1 Quart Jar
8.   Dry Hay-Legume – 1 Slice of a Bale
9.   Dry Hay-Grass- 1 Slice of a Bale
10. Dry Hay-Mixed legume/grass – 1 Slice of a Bale
11. Wrapped Baleage Hay – 1 Gallon zip-lock bag
12. Corn Grain Whole – 1 Quart Jar
13. Corn Grain Ground- 1 Quart Jar
14. Soybean Grain Whole – 1 Quart Jar
15. Cereal Grain Whole – 1 Quart Jar
16. OTHER Pulse OR Brassuca Seed Whole- 1 Quart Jar
Addison County Fair Website: http://www.addisoncountyfielddays.com/
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In the News and Around the Town

Lately we’ve been busy bees (particularly Kirsten Workman!) and have found ourselves on Across the Fence as well as NPR.  Here are some links where you can see and hear more about what we are up to!

http://digital.vpr.net/post/farmers-embrace-cover-crops-improve-soil-reduce-runoff#stream/0

http://digital.vpr.net/post/no-till-tell-all#stream/0

 

 

 

 

3rd Annual No-Till and Cover Crop Symposium

NTCC2016Join Us For This Great Event Full of Useful Information For Your Farm!

February 17th at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Burlington, VT

Registration is now open for this event. We have a day filled with guest speakers and professionals from around the state, country and also Quebec. Speakers will be addressing soil health, herbicides, cover crop research and demonstration trials, no-till successes and challenges, economics and soil conservation.

All the information about this event can be found on our 2016 Symposium Page.

You can register online here.

To view the pdf brochure of the event: NTCC Brochure 2016

We are still accepting sponsors! 2016 Sponsor and Exhibitor Form

Questions? Feel free to contact us! [802-388-4969, cvcrops@uvm.edu]

Spring 2015, Soil Health Field Day

Soil Health Field Day Flyer_Hoorman 2015The snow is melting, the sap is flowing (hopefully), and the crew at CV Crops is dreaming of spring!

Join us for our Spring 2015 Soil Health Field Day

April 21st, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm.

We will be hosting Jim Hoorman, from Ohio State University Extension (PhD candidate and farmer), to discuss:SoilHealth

  • The Biology of Soil Compaction
  • Using Cover Crops to Keep Phosphorus Out of Surface Water
  • Economics of Cover Crops & Weed Suppression

    Soil Health Field Day Flyer_Hoorman 2015_Page_1

 (click on the picture above to view the pdf)

We will meet at the American Legion, have a hot lunch, and then head out to the field to visit Vander Wey’s Nea-Tocht Farm. If you are a farmer, you can attend this field day FOR FREE, due to the generous contributions of Caring Dairy and the Champlain Valley Farmer Coalition.

Service professions are welcome to attend, there will be a $30 fee. Five CCA credits available from this event.

Either way, we request that you register.

You may do so by either calling us at (802) 388-4969, or by registering online: https://www.regonline.com/soilhealth

 

Enter to Win a Door Prize

The survey helps us gauge local farmer practices, adoption, needs, and interests.

It also helps direct our future workshops, events, and research.

Click on the picture to go to the survey.

2015 Survey

Win a free year of goCrop!

Or one of these great books from SARE:

Managing Cover Crops Profitably, 3rd Edition

Building Soils for Better Crops, 3rd Edition

COVER CROP FIELD DAYS…Don’t Miss This!

Join the UVM Extension’s Champlain Valley Crop Soil & Pasture Team and Northwest Crops & Soils Program, the Champlain Valley Farmer Coalition and local farms to check out what farmers around the Champlain Valley are doing on their farms to fit cover crops into their cropping systems.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FIELD DAY FLYER

RSVP Today @ (802) 388-4969 or  champlain.crops@uvm.edu

Friday, October 31st • Pouliot Farm • 1:00-3:00 PMpouliot cc
1478 VT Route 128, Westford, VT  05494
See annual ryegrass, white clover and forage radish mixed right in with Urea and seeded at sidedress time in July.  The Pouliots got a great catch, and now we can see how it survived the traffic during harvest, talk to the farmers about whether or not it competed with the corn, their herbicide program and see what they might change for next year.  An added bonus…Tony will bring out the Great Plains twin-row corn planter.

Thursday, November 6th • Vorsteveld Farm • 1:00-3:00 PM
1/3 Mile East of Panton Village on Panton Rd.
The Vorstevelds welcome us back to get a look at the cover crops that have been growing since mid-August, see the results of manure injection and more.  We’ll also see how their winter rye, winter wheat, oat, radish  cover crop is doing  that they seeded immediately after corn harvest…and how that cover crop did after manure was injected right after seeding.  We can also talk to the Vorstevelds about their ‘minimum till’ system they have been using on their heavy clay soils.  clifford_cig

Friday, November 7th • Clifford Farm • 1:00-3:00 PM
6147 VT Route 116, Starksboro, VT 05487
Check out results of two different cover crop studies – all in one field.  See 10 different three-way cover crop mixes, each planted in July, August and September.  We’ll also take a look at a research plots with winter rye drilled and broadcast, with and without Tillage Radish planted in mid-September.  All of these plots also have portions with and without manure applications.  We’ll also take a look at winter rye broadcast and rolled – per NRCS specifications.

RSVP Today @ (802) 388-4969 or  champlain.crops@uvm.edu

PLUS…Two more workshops in Franklin County:

Nov. 10th 1:00—3:00: A Tour of Cover Crops in St. Albans Bay (St. Albans)

Meet us at our office at 278 S. Main St, St. Albans BEFORE 1pm to join this tour. Depending on numbers, we may rent some vans.
Please RSVP by November 6.

Nov. 12th 1:00—3:00: Cover Crops at Borderview Research Farm (Alburgh)

Come learn about cover crops and our NWCS research looking at cover crop varieties, planting dates, and seeding rates at this field day at Roger and Claire Rainville’s Borderview Research Farm, 146 Line Road, Alburgh, VT
Directions: From Route 2 in Alburgh, turn onto Route 225 (Border Road). Drive toward the Canadian Border. As you approach the border, turn Left just BEFORE Customs. In front of you, there will be a dirt road (Line Road) that
goes West along the border. Borderview Farm is the first farm on the Left.

To RSVP for the Franklin County workshops by Nov. 6th:
Susan Brouillette at (802) 524-6501 x432 or susan.brouillette@uvm.edu

 

Manure and Cover Crops

Manure and Cover Crops…A Winning Combination

by Kirsten Workman, Agronomy Outreach Professional

Fall applied manure is often a subject of concern – for farmers, water quality advocates and even the general public. As you know, most farmers have the conundrum of having ideal field conditions for spreading manure in the fall (dry, open, great weather oftentimes) and a need for making sure they have adequate winter storage, but not wanting to lose out on the nutrients in that manure.. Especially producers who farm heavier soils with higher clay content, that try and avoid as much spring tillage as possible. If you are a no-till farmer, you know even better that fall applied manure without incorporation will not yield much of that nitrogen for you next year’s corn crop. You can lose up to 90% of your ammonium nitrogen with the right (or rather wrong) conditions.

fall manure credits
from Nutrient Recommendations for Field Crops in Vermont

So how do we make the most of fall applied manure… plant a cover crop, of course!! Fall applied manure as part of the establishment of a cover crop can be a win-win. Not only do you better utilize your manure, potentially doubling the amount of nitrogen retained, but your cover crop will perform better too. This all leads to better soil coverage, less erosion, better nutrient cycling, and lower fertilizer costs. Not a bad deal!

Last fall, we conducted a small demo/experiment at the Farm at VYCC in Richmond, Vt. Although this is not ‘scientific research’ per se, we did utilize a randomized split block design with three different treatments with and without manure. On October 2nd, we seeded 100 pounds of winter triticale per acre with different treatments of ‘Purple Bounty’ hairy vetch…either 10, 20 or 30 pounds per acre with the triticale. Five days later, liquid dairy manure was broadcast over half of all the plots at a rate of around 4,000 gallons per acre. We then measured percent cover one month later in November 2013 and then collected forage samples to analyze nutrient content, measured biomass, and re-measured percent cover on May 15th, right before the cover crop was plowed down. We found that the plots that received manure out performed those that didn’t in all aspects that were measured. Not surprisingly, a fertilized cover crop does better!! Plus you have better utilized your fall manure. The manured plots had double the biomass, double the nitrogen and phosphorus and potassium, and roughly one and half times the soil coverage in the fall and spring.

These plots have now been plowed down and were planted to ‘Early Riser’ corn (an 80 day flint/dent variety) on June 7th. No starter fertilizer was applied, and PSNT’s will be taken to make a recommendation for nitrogen later in the season.

vycc data

There is more to come on this topic. This fall will be commencing a two year research project that will investigate combinations of winter rye and tillage radish (in comparison to straight winter rye) established with diary manure. We hope to determine if the addition of the radish in manured systems can amplify winter rye’s effectiveness as a winter cover crop. We also hope to determine the most effective seeding rates and establishment methods.

vetch-cropped

Two Great Upcoming Events…Pastures & Cover Crops

The Champlain Valley Crop, Soil & Pasture Team is pleased to announce two fantastic events in November:

November 8th * 10:00 am to 11:30 pm  *  Ferrisburgh, VT
No-Till Cover Crop FIELD DAYinterseed

Can no-till, cover crop mixes and manure work in corn silage on the clay soils of the Champlain Valley??  We’re trying to find out.  Please join us at the site of one of our on-farm research trialsJoin the Champlain Valley Crop Soil & Pasture Team and Deer Valley Farm as we share our preliminary results from our  Cover Crop Diversity in No-Till Systems SARE Partnership Project.  Come check out our on-farm research plots of two different cover crop mixes in corn silage on CLAY SOIL

Click HERE for the Field Day flyer

RSVP to (802) 388-4969 or kirsten.workman@uvm.edu

 

November 14th  *  10:00 am to 2:30 pm  *  Bridport Community Hall
Champlain Valley Grazing SymposiumOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Join us as we wrap up this year’s grazing season and think ahead to next year! Come hear how planned grazing can be fun
and profitablee. Troy Bishopp, aka “The Grass Whisperer” is an accomplished grazier on his own farm in NY state, in addition to working with the Madison County Soil & Water Conservation District/Upper Susquehanna Coalition as their regional grazing specialist. Troy brings a holistic approach to grazing planning by helping farmers chart a course that pays attention to their personal goals as well as their profits. Julie Smith, UVM Extension Dairy Specialist, will also be here to discuss how to manage and troubleshoot common herd health issues including Johne’s, BVD, and nutritional deficiencies. Julie’s focus is on biosecurity and preventive animal health management. Hope to see you there!

Click HERE for the Grazing Symposium flyer

Register & purchase tickets:  http://grazingsymposium2013.eventbrite.com/

 

Please join us for one or both of these fantastic events. 

If you have  any questions or need more information, please give us a call at (802) 388-4969 or email us at champlain.crops@uvm.edu.

SEE YOU THERE!