Vermonter of the Month: Sharon Russell

This is a monthly series in which the Attorney General will feature a Vermonter doing exemplary work in their community. Have someone you think should be featured? Email AGO.CAP@vermont.gov.

Sharon Garafano Russell is the Executive Director of the Rutland City Rescue Mission, better known at the Open Door Mission. The Open Door Mission houses 51 people and this year they provided 36,000 meals in the Soup Kitchen which serves residents of the Mission and people on the street. They have a staff of 11 that work around the clock providing meals, clean bedding and a clean and safe home for both residents and those just staying a few nights. The Mission serves three meals a day and runs on the proceeds of their thrift store, an annual golf tournament and individual donations. Under Sharon’s leadership, this structure has become a model for veteran shelters across the country.

Sharon has dedicated her life to helping the disenfranchised, supporting all people independent of their appearance, past or place in life. She has received countless awards over the years, most recently “The Unsung Hero Award” from her alma mater Mount St. Joseph Academy (MSJ Class of ’65).

After growing up in Rutland, Sharon completed her bachelors in early education from the University of Maryland. She then taught special education and served as the head of the Adult Education Program at the Brandon Training School for eleven years. This was followed by the state exam for social work, which led her to the Open Door Mission.

Sharon lives in Rutland with her two children, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

What inspires your work with the Open Door Mission?

What inspires me most is I went to MSJ and was always taught by nuns who said we should pay our good luck forward, and so too again when I attended The College of St Joseph. Second, and probably the most important, is that Jody Fish, a classmate at MSJ, went to Vietnam and never returned. That is why I contract with the VA to work with veterans.

What impact has the Open Door Mission had on your community?

The impact on our community is that the disenfranchised and the homeless veteran has a warm bed and 3 hot meals daily in our soup kitchen, where we serve 120 meals daily. We also serve folks from the street. There is nothing better then to see a small child go home with a full tummy and a smile–it makes my day–or when a veteran who has been on the streets in larger cities tells us how special our food is.

What have you learned from your work at the Open Door Mission?

Every day I learn something new. A few of those lessons are: but for how my life has been I could be on the streets; I have learned that labels are for cans, not for people; and we don’t always know what is causing people to have addictions or mental illness. I have learned if each one of us tries, we can make a difference in the world.

What advice do you have for others looking to impact their community?

My advice for others is to make a impact on the community, stop and look around. You will see the need. Don’t judge people, for you will find that most are good people who have chosen that road that is too often traveled. I suggest instead, as Robert Frost wrote, to take the one “less traveled” in order to make a difference.

Match or Mooch? Preventing Romance Scams

Too often, Vermonters reveal to us that a scammer lied to them about being in a long-distance relationship. These scams can be heartbreaking. They are not uncovered until the love interest asks for money—or once money gets sent. Sent money can’t be retrieved, making the betrayal more painful.

Vermonters lose tens of thousands of dollars each year to romance scams. This scam continues to affect more people than other wire transfer scams. So, what’s going on?

Most romance scams initiate through dating websites and apps, like Match, Zoosk, Senior People Meet, OK Cupid, and Meet Me. Connecting online and through apps makes it easy for scammers to hide their identity. You could be chatting daily with a person who describes themself as “tall, dark, and good-looking”—but is not. Scammers succeed because online dating gives the option of communicating without ever meeting in person, or talking on the phone.

Not all online dating is bad. In fact, Consumer Reports found in a survey that 44% of respondents said online dating led to a serious long-term relationship or marriage. With such high odds in finding “the one,” how can you continue to use online dating and stay safe when looking for love?

We’ve created a table to help you determine if you’re being contacted by a MATCH or a MOOCH.

In 2016, a law was passed that requires internet dating services to notify Vermont members of noticeable changes in their account, such as when their account is hacked and being used maliciously by a romance scammer. Internet dating services must also alert Vermont members who had previously corresponded with a newly banned member, letting them know they may have been contacted by a romance scammer. So this Valentine’s Day, protect yourself from romance scams and find a match, not a mooch.

Contributing writer & graphic: Crystal Baldwin