Announcing June 8 Eastern Viticulture and Enology Forum “Town Hall: Questions from the Field and Cellar”

Sharing this from our colleagues across the lake. This looks like a great opportunity for learning. -TB

In collaboration with viticulture and enology extension programs at: Ohio State University, University of Maryland, Rutgers University, North Carolina State University, University of Tennessee, Texas Tech, Texas A&M, Iowa State University, Purdue University, University of Minnesota, Michigan State University, and the University of Wisconsin

VT Grape IPM: Early season disease and vine management

As she had last year, Dr. Katie Gold, plant pathologist at Cornell, has posted a summary of grape disease issues and recommendations. Here it is as a web page and as a PDF.

Growth in the UVM vineyard ranges from bud burst to 2-3 shoots emerged; a few shoots are nearing three inches in length. It’s time to really be thinking about protecting vines from early season disease infections. Most cold-climate cultivars will not need disease protection until 5-8” of shoot growth, but any vineyards with heavy disease pressure last year and organic vineyards may wish to begin earlier, especially if inoculum reduction through thorough removal of diseased wood and mummy berries and/or dormant application of lime sulfur was not performed. I still recommend our fact sheet, An Initial Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Strategy for New Cold Climate Winegrape Growers as the best resource to boil the decisions down to a simple ‘prescription’, with the caveat that since it was written some new pest management materials have been released and inoculum may have increased in your vineyards which could lead to increased disease pressure. Growers should have an up-to-date copy of the New England Small Fruit Management Guide (on-line and hard copy versions) and/or New York and Pennsylvania Pest Management Guidelines for Grapes as a reference for specific materials, their efficacy, and use considerations. Remember however that the guidelines are written largely for vinifera and less disease-resistant hybrids, so the specific spray programs recommended may be overkill in Vermont vineyards.

I’d say any time now is good to get your shoots thinned down to 3-5 shoots per foot of canopy. Keep more on more vigorous vines, less on weaker ones.

Where trade names or commercial products are used for identification, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied. Always read the label before using any pesticide. The label is the legal document for the product use. Disregard any information in this message if it is in conflict with the label.

The UVM Tree Fruit and Viticulture Program is supported by the University of Vermont Agriculture Experiment Station, UVM Extension, USDA NIFA E-IPM Program, and USDA Risk Management Agency.

UVM Extension helps individuals and communities put research-based knowledge to work. University of Vermont Extension, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, cooperating, offer education and employment to everyone without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or familial status.

Important Grape Survey: Please complete this week if you can

Good evening:

The UVM Fruit Program is working on a number of grant applications and planned activities for the coming season and needs information from the industry to best direct our efforts. You can help by completing this survey as soon as possible so that we may guide our grant writing efforts in the next week or so. Please complete by Sunday, April 11 if possible. We are looking for input from vineyards and wineries of all sizes, as in Vermont as well as surrounding states.

https://go.uvm.edu/uvmgrapesurvey

The first part of the survey should only take a few minutes to complete. The last section should also go quickly, but asks for detailed cultivar, acreage, and crop price information, so having that data handy for your vineyard / winery would be handy when completing.

Data will only be reported in aggregate form- Qualtrics does not allow us to track responses to surveys back to individual operations. All data are accessible only to UVM Fruit Program Director Terence Bradshaw, and we are bound to strict confidentiality. If you have any questions. Please contact me directly.

Thank you,

Terry Bradshaw

Vineyard nutrition survey for distribution to Vermont growers

Passing this vineyard nutrition survey on from Patty Skinkis at Oregon State. They are hoping to collect this data in April. -TB

Vineyard Nutrition Survey

A multi-institutional research team involved in the HiRes Vineyard Nutrient Management Project seeks to understand current vineyard practices and the technologies that may be used for improving nutrient management practices. They invite all commercial grape growers, consultants, and vineyard management companies from the wine, table, raisin, and juice grape industries across the US to complete a survey. The survey will gather input on what, how, and why nutrient practices are used in vineyards. Make sure your state and grape sector are represented–participate today!

To complete the survey, go to https://beav.es/JRk.

If you have any questions about the survey or the research, please contact Patty Skinkis, Oregon State University, or Markus Keller, Washington State University.

Patricia A. Skinkis, PhD

Professor & Viticulture Extension Specialist

Oregon State University | Department of Horticulture

Oregon Wine Research Institute

4017 Ag & Life Sci Bldg

2750 SW Campus Way

Corvallis, OR 97331

P: 541-737-1411

Faculty website | Extension website |OWRI website

Webinar tomorrow: NEWA 2.0: Project upgrades for 2021

Here’s a reminder that tomorrow, Tuesday March 30, we will host the final New England Winter Fruit Seminar of the season: NEWA 2.0: Project upgrades for 2021. More information and registration at: https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/events/newa-20-project-upgrades-for-2021. Please plan to register at least 30 minutes prior to the webinar, which will run from 12:00 to 1:30 PM.

The webinar will feature Dan Olmstead. Dr. Olmstead is an Extension Associate with the New York State IPM Program at Cornell AgriTech. He is the program coordinator for NEWA, the Network for Environment and Weather Applications. NEWA is an online platform that provides decision support information for insect pests, plant diseases, and crop management in fruit, vegetable, and field crop commodities. These resources are accessible at http://newa.cornell.edu free of charge to all producers in any of NEWA’s 15 member states in the US.

Upcoming webinar on Grapevine Nutrition: Nutrient Requirements, Tissue Tests, and Mycorrhizae

Some of you may be interested in this upcoming webinar from Penn State Viticulture And Enology team. -TB

Grapevine Nutrition: Nutrient Requirements, Tissue Tests, and Mycorrhizae

Presenter: Paul Schreiner, Plant Physiologist, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Horticultural Crops Research, Corvallis, OR.

To be covered: This live webinar will review the basics of plant nutrition and the tissue tests used to assess the nutrient status of grapevines. There will be research presented on the N, P, and K requirements of Pinot noir and corresponding tissue test values needed to achieve production goals. Lastly, we will discuss the management of mycorrhizal fungi in vineyards.

When: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 (3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET)

To register: https://extension.psu.edu/grapevine-nutrition-nutrient-requirements-tissue-tests-and-mycorrhizae

Webinars are offered at no charge, but registration is required.

Important changes to UVM Fruit website, and upcoming winter educational opportunities

As we shift into winter, I’d like to highlight some changes among the UVM Fruit program, and to present a number of opportunities for learning and networking this season. First, our website which has been operating since 2013 was retired on fairly short notice when the background sofytware was retired by . Thanks to the Extension Web Team, we now have a new site shared with the Vegetable Program, now together known as UVM Commercial Horticulture. The site is not completely migrated yet, but is largely in-place at: https://www.uvm.edu/extension/horticulture/commercial. Please update your bookmarks, but save the “…this link is broken…” emails for a bit until we can get things squared away. The complementary UVM Fruit Blog is still available, but will likely be tweaked a bit this winter to make specific material easier to find. Consider the website as the main site for static information, and the blog as a place where I post more time-sensitive material, particularly an archive of all emails sent to our mailing lists.

One of the key outputs of our program is the annual Vermont Tree Fruit Grower Association meeting held every February. Obviously, that is not going to happen this year. On the other hand, we do have a number of online meetings and webinars that will provide opportunity for learning, collaboration, and to acquire pesticide applicator’s recertification credits. These will happen under different banners, so I’ll summarize them below. All of these require preregistration, and each platform has a different sign up.

2020 Vermont Vegetable and Berry Grower Webinar Series registration (all use same link, on right side of page)

  • 12/2/2020: Bags, Liners, Containers – So Many Options – Chris Callahan
  • 12/9/2020: Adding Tree Fruit to a Diversified Farm – Terry Bradshaw
  • 12/16/2020: VVBGA Meet and Greet. Lisa McDougall, Justin Rich, Andy Jones

2020 UVM Fruit Program / VT Tree Fruit Growers Assoc Annual Meeting.

  • 2/18/2021: Meeting hosted by UVM Fruit Program on Zoom; VTFGA will handle registration (watch for details)

2020-2021 New England Winter Fruit Meetings registration page (not all meetings set up for registration yet)

A collaboration among the New England Tree Fruit Extension Professionals. Most of these meetings will qualify for pesticide recertification credits.

  • 1/12/2021: Harvista and SmartFresh on Honeycrisp and Other Varieties; CA Storage Techniques Presenter: Jennifer DeEll, OMAFRA and Randolph Beaudry, MSU
  • 1/19/2021 : Training and Pruning Strategies for Healthy and Productive Peach Trees Presenter: Bill Shane, MSU
  • 1/26/2021: Blueberry Twig Blight Diseases Presenter: Mark Longstroth, MSU
  • 2/9/2021: Cider Apples in 2021: Where Do We Stand? Presenters: Terry Bradshaw and Liz Garofalo
  • 2/16/2021: Invasive Insect Pests: Spotted Wing Drosophila, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and Spotted Lantern Fly Presenter: Jaime Piñero, UMass
  • 3/3/2021: Managing a Trickster: Adventures in Apple Maggot Control Presenter: Suzanne Blatt, Ag Canada
  • 3/10/2021: Research Update on Early-Season Insect Pests Presenter: Jaime Piñero, UMass and Glen Koeher, UMaine Extension
  • 3/17/2021: Honeycrisp Bitter Pit and Soft Scald Management Presenters: Renae Moran and Glen Koehler, UMaine Extension
  • 3/23/2021: Tree Row Volume: What it is, why it matters and when to use it Presenter: Terry Bradshaw, UVM
  • 3/30/2021: Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA) 2.0 – Project Upgrades 2021 Presenter: Dan Olmstead, NEWA

There are more details to come on all of these, and each will be outlined in later posts. I look forward to a productive winter, and wish everyone the best during this holiday season.

Take care,

Terry

Buds are bursting- 2020 season is on a roll

By Terence Bradshaw

Growth in the UVM vineyard ranges from bud burst to 2-3 shoots emerged; a few shoots are nearing three inches in length. It’s time to really be thinking about protecting vines from early season disease infections. Most cold-climate cultivars will not need disease protection until 5-8” of shoot growth, but any vineyards with heavy disease pressure last year and organic vineyards may wish to begin earlier, especially if inoculum reduction through thorough removal of diseased wood and mummy berries and/or dormant application of lime sulfur was not performed. I still recommend our fact sheet, An Initial Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Strategy for New Cold Climate Winegrape Growers as the best resource to boil the decisions down to a simple ‘prescription’, with the caveat that since it was written some new pest management materials have been released and inoculum may have increased in your vineyards which could lead to increased disease pressure. Growers should have an up-to-date copy of the New England Small Fruit Management Guide (on-line and hard copy versions) and/or New York and Pennsylvania Pest Management Guidelines for Grapes as a reference for specific materials, their efficacy, and use considerations. Remember however that the guidelines are written largely for vinifera and less disease-resistant hybrids, so the specific spray programs recommended may be overkill in Vermont vineyards.

The warm weather in the past few days may have increased emergence of grape flea beetle or cutworms. Grapes are susceptible through about the one inch shoot growth stage, so vines will eventually outgrow the threat. However, cooler temperatures this coming weekend may hold the vines at this susceptible stage long enough for damage to increase to unacceptable levels. A scouting of your vineyard for feeding on swelling buds or developing shoots may be warranted. If damage is evident on more than 2% of buds, an insecticide treatment may be warranted. But if shoots expand rapidly over the weekend, don’t worry about this pest. More information may be found here.

Since buds at ground level have begun to emerge, applications of systemic herbicides should either be halted or very carefully controlled to prohibit contact with green tissue. Now is an appropriate time for cultivation in vineyards to manage weeds. It’s also a good time to keep water on newly planted or young vines. With soil warming and growth beginning, nitrogen fertilizer applications, if needed based on foliar analyses or observed low vigor last year, may also be made now.

I’d say any time now is good to get your shoots thinned down to 3-5 shoots per foot of canopy. Keep more on more vigorous vines, less on weaker ones.

Where trade names or commercial products are used for identification,

no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Always read the label before using any pesticide.

The label is the legal document for the product use.

Disregard any information in this message if it is in conflict with the

label.

The UVM Tree Fruit and Viticulture Program is supported by the

University of Vermont Agriculture Experiment Station, a USDA NIFA E-IPM

Grant, and USDA Risk Management Agency Funds.

Sheep in vineyards survey, bud beak

By Terence Bradshaw

Dr. Justine Vanden Heuvel (Cornell University) is seeking participants for a conducting a survey to determine grower perceptions of using sheep to mow/sucker in vineyards. The goal of the survey is to guide future research and extension efforts in this area. The survey is completely anonymous. You can complete the survey by clicking on this link: https://cornell.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_80QJfMVgdqIqOOh

Buds are on the cusp of breaking in Vermont vineyards this week, which signifies the real start of the growing season. This brings up a few pest management considerations for your vineyards. Most cold-climate cultivars will not need disease protection until 5-8” of shoot growth, but any vineyards with heavy disease pressure last year or under organic management may wish to begin as soon as shoots are 3” in length, especially if inoculum reduction through thorough removal of diseased wood and mummy berries and/or dormant application of lime sulfur was not performed. Since we all likely have a couple of weeks before we need to get out there, now is a good time to make sure that your equipment is ready to go. I still recommend our Initial IPM Strategy for Cold Climate Grapes as the best resource to boil the decisions down to a simple ‘prescription’, with the caveat that since it was written some new pest management materials have been released and inoculum may have increased in your vineyards which could lead to increased disease pressure. Growers should have an up-to-date copy of the New York and Pennsylvania Pest Management Guidelines for Grapes as a reference for specific materials, their efficacy, and use considerations. Remember however that the guidelines are written largely for vinifera and less disease-resistant hybrids, so the specific spray programs recommended may be overkill in Vermont vineyards.

The warm weather in the next few days may increase emergence of grape flea beetle or cutworms. Grapes are susceptible through about the one inch shoot growth stage, so this could be a short window and the vines may well outgrow any threat pretty quickly. A scouting of your vineyard for feeding on swelling buds or developing shoots may be warranted. If damage is evident on more than 2% of buds, an insecticide treatment may be warranted. But if shoots expand rapidly over the weekend, don’t worry about this pest.

Since buds at ground level have begun to emerge, applications of systemic herbicides should either be halted or very carefully controlled to prohibit contact with green tissue. Now is an appropriate time for cultivation in vineyards to manage weeds. It’s also a good time to keep water on newly planted or young vines. With soil warming and growth beginning, nitrogen fertilizer applications, if needed based on foliar analyses or observed low vigor last year, may also be made now.

Where trade names or commercial products are used for identification,

no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Always read the label before using any pesticide.

The label is the legal document for the product use.

Disregard any information in this message if it is in conflict with the

label.

The UVM Tree Fruit and Viticulture Program is supported by the

University of Vermont Agriculture Experiment Station, a USDA NIFA E-IPM

Grant, and USDA Risk Management Agency Funds.

Buds swelling in local vineyards

By Terence Bradshaw

Grapevine buds are showing significant swelling in vineyards both in the Champlain Valley and at my house at near-1500 feet in Washington County, so bud break is right around the corner. However, This extended cool weather expected this week will leave those buds in this swollen state for an extended period, which leaves them susceptible to damage from grape flea beetle and climbing cutworms. It may be a good idea to scout vineyards this week; feeding damage on more3 than 2% of buds scouted may indicate a need to treat; carbaryl or a pyrethroid material (Including, for organic growers, Pyranic) would be effective options. However, once vines have pushed 1” or more growth, they are no longer susceptible to damage from these pests, so don’t bother treating if you get that far without having done so.

The window to treat vines with liquid lime sulfur (LLS) is closing as vine growth increases, do not consider applying high doses of that material to vines with green tissue showing. I described the use of LLS in my April 3, 2017 message.

If you will be using glyphosate to manage in-row weeds this spring, your window for safest application to the base of vines is now, before any foliage that is susceptible to herbicide uptake develops. I would still use a shield of some sort to keep the material off of vines.

Reminder: NY-PA Grape IPM Guidelines are available for order at: https://cropandpestguides.cce.cornell.edu/

Where trade names or commercial products are used for identification,

no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Always read the label before using any pesticide.

The label is the legal document for the product use.

Disregard any information in this message if it is in conflict with the

label.

The UVM Tree Fruit and Viticulture Program is supported by the

University of Vermont Agriculture Experiment Station, a USDA NIFA E-IPM

Grant, and USDA Risk Management Agency Funds.