Library of Congress RSS Feeds

The Library of Congress has launched a series of news feeds using the RSS (Really Simple Syndication) technology. http://www.loc.gov/rss/
The Library’s RSS service has launched with the following feeds:
* News, a bulletin service of the latest news from the world’s preeminent reservoir of knowledge, providing resources to Congress and the American people
* Upcoming Events, a listing of the dozens of free concerts, lectures, exhibitions, symposia, films and other special programs offered at the Library on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
* New on the Web, updates on new collections, features, reference materials and other services available on the Library’s award-winning Web site
* New Webcasts, the latest webcasts and podcasts of lectures and events sponsored by the Library
* News from the John W. Kluge Center, featuring updates on lectures, presentations and other news from this center for scholars within the Library of Congress, established to bring together the world’s best thinkers to stimulate and energize scholarly discussion, distill wisdom from the Library’s rich resources and interact with policy-makers in Washington.
* And What’s New in Science Reference, new products and services on the subject of science and technology from the Library’s Science, Technology & Business Division.
These feeds join four existing RSS feeds from the U.S. Copyright Office in the Library of Congress on current copyright related legislation; announcements, rules, proposed rules and other notices published in the Federal Register; NewsNet (alerts on hearings, deadlines for comments, new and proposed regulations and new publications); and updates to the Copyright Web site at www.copyright.gov.
The Library will launch additional feeds in specific content and subject matter areas in the coming months. All new RSS feeds will be available from key content pages within the Library’s extensive Web site, as well as from a central RSS Web page at www.loc.gov/rss/.

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