Hop Sensory Training Courses

UVM Extension Northwest Crops and Soils program is hosting “The Basics of Descriptive Sensory Analysis” 2021 Sensory Training course. UVM Extension’s sensory expert, Roy Desrochers, will be the instructor for this interactive comprehensive six module virtual training program, that will be held Tuesday and Thursdays from March 30 to April 15, 8:30am to 10:00am. The …

Japanese Beetles in Hops in the Northeast

The Japanese beetle (Popillia Japonica) can be a significant economic pest in Northeastern hop yards. Japanese beetles begin to show up in Vermont at the very end of June or early July, and are most active on warm, sunny days. We spotted a Japanese beetle in our hop yard at Borderview Farm on July 1. …

Potato Leafhoppers have Arrived!

It is leafhopper season again and those pesky insects have been spotted at our research hop yard at Borderview Research Farm, in Alburgh, Vermont. This is a great time to start scouting for insects as well as for disease to ensure proper management of all hop pests. So far, this season has not been conducive …

What to be on the lookout for in your hop yard

The three major arthropod pests of hops in the Northeast are Potato Leafhopper (PLH), Two-spotted Spider Mites (TSSM), and Hop Aphids (HA). This incidence of these pests in hop yards is based on the weather conditions, and we found that the hop aphids preferred cool and moist conditions and populations peaked around the time of …

Stringing and Training Hops

Stringing often starts in April for many farmers in the Northeast. Stringing consists of tying coir twine to the top supporting wire of the hop trellis and stapling the bottom of twine into the ground next to the hop plant.  Depending on trellising style and setup, 1-4 strings will be run to each crown, though …

Crowning and Early Season Downy Mildew Control

Hop downy mildew is currently the biggest disease concern for Northeastern hop growers.  Downy mildew overwinters in the hop crown and primary inoculum will be released from the first shoots. Removal of the infected crown or the first flush of spring hop growth is called “crowning” or “scratching”. Shoot removal is used as an early season preventative measure …

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