Down the rabbit hole: More on multispecies organisms

I just tripped and fell down another rabbit hole. I was going to skip this week, but I would love input on this issue, so here it is. Earlier I argued that the organism was a multispecies entity. This makes perfect sense if we consider mitochondria to be symbiotic bacteria in a host cell, and […]

Some thoughts on aging and the phenotype

I have been gone a while. Something of a creative meltdown after the Evolution meetings. Perhaps one to many Caparinha, at what might have been the best party ever at an Evolution meeting. Leave it to the Brazilians to throw a party with enough food and liquor and the wackiest live music ever. In any […]

Why there is no Genic Selection

This is the week before the Evolution meetings, so the big question of the day is what can I post that I believe to be true, and will rile enough people up to get a good discussion going. I decided Sam Scheiner was a good target – we were graduate students together, he is a […]

Why reductionism DOES work: Individuals to genes

In the last couple of posts I have suggested that reductionism is for chumps. Two weeks ago I argued that gene interactions made average effects wonder around all over the place, and last week I argued that indirect genetic effects mucked up the works if there was population structure. This would seem to imply that […]

Why reductionism doesn’t work, Part 2: Groups to individuals

Williams (1966) famously wrote “In explaining adaptation, one should assume the adequacy of the simplest form of natural selection, that of alternative alleles in Mendelian populations, unless the evidence clearly shows that this theory does not suffice.” This principle of parsimony makes two interesting points. The first phrase “In explaining adaptation” makes the point that […]

Why reductionism doesn’t work; Part 1, Individuals to genes

One thing that often used to happen, perhaps not so much any more, is that people will say that we don’t need to worry about levels of selection because all selection can be reduced to selection acting directly on genes. George Williams perhaps put this view best, first with his principle of parsimony, which argues […]

Epistasis in Monkey Flowers, and some general thoughts on epistasis

So, at least my twitterverse has been on fire suddenly with the appearance of a new article in PLoS by Patrick Monnahan and John Kelly “Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus”  . It really is a nice study in which they identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) in […]

Matrix comparisons: Random skewers and selection skewers

A week late and a dollar short, but lets continue comparing matrices. Continuing on with my blatant endorsement of statistical methods attached to my name. . .  Last time I talked about the “Rank”/“Signed Bartlett”/”Modified Mantel” tests for comparing the dimension size and shape of a pair of matrices. This is only one of several […]

Statistical tests for comparing matrices

I have been remiss. Quite a few years ago I found myself in the position of wanting to compare two genetic covariance matrices. At the time it was before the Flury hierarchy had been suggested by Pat Phillips (Phillips & Arnold 1999. Evolution 53: 1506-1515), so I found myself in a position of needing to […]

Individuality, Microbiomes, and organisms

So many things to write about, and so much writing to do. Sorry about missing last week. Somehow writing this week has been more of a chore than a joy. One of the things it has been suggested I write about is the continuing brouhaha over Nowak’s paper (Nowak, et al. 2010. Nature 466: 1057), […]