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Archive for the ‘SoundScape’ Category

My musical, intellectual, and ecocultural interests would not have evolved the way they did without Daevid Allen — beat poet, musical visionary, and psychedelic rocker who died last week at age 77. Here’s a personal account of why. In the background are the social, material, and ecological connections that I intend to examine more closely in […]

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One of my pet musicological theories is that the years 1967-74 were the most creative 7-year period in the history of musical humanity. Why those years? The social and technological revolutions of the 1960s — civil rights, the women’s movement, the counterculture and anti-Vietnam War movements, the sudden unifying singularity of television and mass (and […]

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It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything about music here. But as I’ve gotten thinking and writing about it again, under the “ecomusicology” rubric, expect more of it on this blog. It’s a satisfying return for me (I studied music theory, composition, and performance as an undergrad and continued it semi-professionally for a little while afterward). This […]

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I am about to travel to Asheville, North Carolina, for the Ecomusics and Ecomusicologies conference, to be held from Thursday through Monday at the University of North Carolina Asheville. The international conference, which has become an annual event (it met previously in Brisbane, Australia, and in New Orleans), brings together theorists and researchers with performers and practitioners. Panels on topics including “musical […]

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[Note: This post has been edited slightly since it was first published, to clarify the difference between sound waves and radio waves.] Everything new under the sun begins as an anomaly; but not everything thought to be new is genuinely new. Everything new and anomalous, if studied in the right way, can be explained; but it may take years […]

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New growth…

http://youtu.be/BzZBcqOe2lw And while we’re on a grassy, shooty, growthy theme (and in the midst of a rare spurt of blog activity)… I’ve been wanting for years to write a book about “Laughing Stock,” the stunningly beautiful final album from Talk Talk, so many worlds beyond where they started, and the epitome of a process-relational musical […]

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Bitches Brew Revisited

Graham Haynes’s band touring under the name Bitches Brew Revisited, after the famous album by Miles Davis that turned 40 last year, opened the Burlington jazz festival last week. They were wonderful.

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Ever becoming…

Glad someone uploaded this to YouTube… It’s, of course, the Heart Sutra via the Akron/Family. “Gone, gone, gone beyond, gone completely beyond…” “Gone, gone, gone to the Other Shore, attained the Other Shore having never left. Oh what an awakening! All hail!”  

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Today’s link dump is devoted to sound, earth, religion, language, and the creativity of friends… First the sounds. Here’s Science Friday’s Earth Day episode on the origins of music in the Great Animal Orchestra; and what American English sounds like to non-English speakers (hilarious):

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Some Landscapes has a great post about landscape artist/musician Richard Skelton. As evident in works like Landings, Skelton is an artmonk, an eco-process-relationalist extraordinaire, and very much the musical equivalent of the kinds of artists I wrote about here. Threads Across the River (which follows Scar Tissue in the video below) is beautiful:

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