Preliminary Research Investigating Cramping and Prefrontal Cortex Activity in Healthy Volunteers Controlling for Administration of THC or CBD, as well as Voluntary Exercise

Preliminary Research Investigating Cramping and Prefrontal Cortex Activity in Healthy Volunteers Controlling for Administration of THC or CBD, as well as Voluntary Exercise

  So the problem is pretty simple in outlook. Cannabidiol is legal for recreational use in the United States currently, but has not been recognized particularly as having medical applications and it may not even be an option to prescribe it. There is a body, which is appropriate for the potential of the product in its anxiolytic and anticonvulsant properties, which are confirmed, of evidence which suggests it has use for athletes and people with medical diagnosis to improve with cramping symptoms and pre-frontal cortex activity, respectively as well as other symptoms of illness (Ashton). This research has not been done with healthy volunteers in the United States of America, but Germany and other member states of the European Union appear to have such research underway.
  This research includes applications for use with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is not believed to have an effect on the pre-frontal cortex in a reproducible manner, except through childhood use as cited in previous research. No studies have used children that I have been involved in, to the best of my knowledge, though there is a substantial body of evidence regarding the impacts of THC on growth in children. Regular underage use as established by research on the topic of THC was not extant in this trial and the earliest confirmed exposure was between 15 and 17, though a couple to a maximum of three solitary experiences or exposures are strongly suspected before. Alcohol is not believed to have been used in a manner which should impact research currently, and has not been a factor in recent research, with last exposure occurring nearly four years ago.
  At the beginning of July 2016, after 3-6 months without cannabis exposure, which was confirmed by UA analysis and no believed CBD exposure though there is no way to confirm that, given current resources readily available, cramping was experienced while swimming, as has been normal for the subject as an excellent athlete and created periods of significant pain. This is exacerbated by a preliminary diagnosis of degenerative disc disease in 2013, and could have been dangerous to the life of the subject with long-term physical activity without proper actions or steps taken ahead of time.
  Rude behavior at this point is believed to be indicative of lapses in prefrontal cortex judgement, albeit minor, and this is the sort of information which will be advisable to collect for recreational marketing studies with the new and fascinating product cannabidiol along with cramping and muscle soreness. The research now includes confirmed exposure to THC in a healthy volunteer with peak levels of nearly 700 ng/ml in urine analysis as well as intensive exercise. This was not an intended level, and there may have been issues with the testing, and a confirmed negative was believed to have occurred after one month using urine analysis. A similar social encounter can be confirmed during this period without a rude or socially unacceptable response.
  Following one month without exposure to THC and with exposure to CBD, the trial was run again with expected exposure to THC and no significant amounts of CBD over the course of some weeks at which point cramping cramping did ensue. Investigating further, a similar social interaction, all of which regard positive rewards naturally, produced a rude response. This indicates that the benefits to the prefrontal cortex are not due to THC but cannabidiol.
  It should be clear that a trial without CBD, THC, or exercise using these same measures is still missing in order to obtain a clear baseline, so this research has been classified as preliminary in nature. As a person in severe pain without use of CBD, I do not believe it to be ethical to require this study be carried out by myself. If you would be, as a person who is not using marijuana, constituent compounds, or activities and substances which have been shown in research to have any impact on the measures being evaluated in this study, so kind as to fulfill this study and to cease regular activity for between one week and one month in order to complete this study, while noting cramping and prefrontal cortex activity indicators, it would be helpful to me. Should a description of the experience be acceptable then it might be possible to provide this research in conjunction with the work so far. Dietary factors are being intentionally excluded, and are not believed to be a factor, as even consumption of food shortly before intensive physical activity did not induce cramping with use of CBD, although combined with necessitated dehydration over the course of relatively short time period did result in physical activity related nausea, no other serious complications had to be recorded.
References:
Ashton, C. H., and P. B. Moore. “Endocannabinoid system dysfunction in mood and related disorders.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 124.4 (2011): 250-261.
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