1. INTEREST: In order to remember something thoroughly, you must be interested in it.
  2. INTENT TO REMEMBER: Your intent to remember has much to do with whether you remember something or not. A key factor to remembering is having a POSITIVE ATTITUDE that you WILL remember.
  3. BASIC BACKGROUND: Your understanding of new materials depends to a great degree on how much you already know about the subject. The more you increase your basic knowledge, the easier it is to build new knowledge on that background.
  4. SELECTIVITY: You must determine what is important and select those parts to study and learn

You can use clues in your class notes or textbook to determine what is most important to study.

5. MEANINGFUL ORGANIZATION: You can learn to remember better if you group ideas into meaningful categories

If you have a large list of items to remember, cluster similar items around a heading or category

6. RECITATION: Saying ideas out loud in your own words is the most powerful tool you have for transferring information from short term memory to long term memory

Flash cards and study cards are often helpful in learning new material as they make you a participant, not just an onlooker.

7. MENTAL VISUALIZATION: Another principle is making a mental picture of what needs to be remembered. By visualizing, you use an entirely different part of the brain then you did by reading or listening

Add illustrations, maps, or graphs to your notes to help you understand and remember

8. ASSOCIATION: Memory is increased when facts to be learned are associated with something familiar to you.

Use logical connections such as maps or diagrams

Make artificial connections through visualizations, rhymes, and mnemonic devices.

9. CONSOLIDATION: Your brain must have time for new information to soak in. When you make a list or review your notes right after class, you are using the principle of consolidation.

10.DISTRIBUTED PRACTICE: A series of shorter study sessions over several days is preferable to fewer but longer sessions.