USA Volunteer Water Monitoring Network

Decontamination Methods

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Question

Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2008 12:53:48 -0500
From: “Boward, Dan”

Hi Folks.

I help run a statewide volunteer stream monitoring program, Maryland Stream Waders (see http://www.dnr.maryland.gov/streams/streamWaders.asp), the volunteer component of the Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS). Stream Waders volunteers sample aquatic invertebrates in wadeable, freshwater streams throughout Maryland. Beginning last year, we began decontaminating (with bleach) all MBSS equipment that contacts stream water to guard against the spread of didymo and whirling disease. Has anyone taken such precautions with volunteer stream monitors? We want to administer a protocol this year that will work with the 150 or so volunteers we expect to sample this spring.

Any advice would be greatly helpful.

Thanks!

Dan Boward
Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Monitoring and Non-tidal Assessment Division
Ecological Assessment Program
580 Taylor Ave.; C-2
Annapolis, Maryland 21401
410-260-8605 (voice)
410-260-8620 (fax)
dboward@dnr.state.md.us

Responses

Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2008 14:22:36 -0600
From: Kris Stepenuck

Dan

We asked volunteers to follow disinfection protocols to protect against viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) and other invasives. There are details in our summer newsletter and links in there to protocols (which are the same our Dept. of Natural Resources staff are asked to follow.

Here’s a link: http://watermonitoring.uwex.edu/pdf/level1/news/Spring2007News.pdf

Only those people monitoring multiple locations were asked to follow the actual disinfection protocols since drying equipment is acceptable as well.

Let me know if I can provide other details.

Cheers,

Kris Stepenuck

 

Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 12:11:48 -0500
From: Danielle Donkersloot

As it relates to didymo….Our network just sent out an alert to the stream monitors within NJ. The alert was to notify them on what the stuff looks like (rock snot) and what to do to prevent spreading it….We may have to be more proactive with it.

According to Fish and Wildlife, NJ does not have a problem with it yet, but it’s coming.

Is anyone keeping track of this stuff in the NE?

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