Archive for March, 2017

New phenology site: The Milton Natue Preserve

Natural history: My site has been protected for a really long time. It has always been dense in trees. The only big human impact on this place is fishing. There was also a time where the pond had overflowed and the town had to bring in sand to stop the flooding.

Phenology: This nature preserve is very rich in evergreens. They are mostly all grouped together with little distance in-between them. There are medium sized trees that are all a similar height and then a new generation of trees under them which are the same height.  As you get closer to the river there are more maple trees and birches.  There is also more smaller vegetation.

 

Pictures:

 

Map:

 

 

 

The natural community of my place

Natural community: My spot is a mix between a wetland and a woodland. There is a river that flows through my sight that has some wetland plants growing on the edges. The rest of the site is all woodland. Its not very dense at all. Most of the trees have fallen down in my area. The only species really are the one green ash tree and a couple red maples. There is also a small coverage of lady ferns.  Right now my sight looks pretty dead but, there might be potential for more trees to grow in that area. based on all the small vegetation.

 

Phenological changes: Since I had last been at my sight more trees have fallen down. One being one of the only medium sized trees. The only trees left are the Green ash and a bunch of smaller trees. Regardless of it being winter my spot looked really green. The lady ferns that cover the ground are very prominent again. The river going around my sight is frozen over with a sheet ice. There are some non covered areas that reveled the fast moving pace of the river resulting from the snow melting.

Bio-finder:  My spot is in an area that is considered a class 2 wetland which I thought was very interesting.  Its states it in a protected area which is not surprising because my spot is in Centennial woods.  It also is considered a common natural community.

 

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