Posts Tagged ‘Microsoft Deployment Toolkit’

Automated Driver Import in MDT 2013

As a follow up to my previous post, I also have developed a script to automate the import of drivers into MDT 2013.  This PowerShell script takes a source folder structure and duplicates the top two levels of folders in the MDT Deployment Share “Out-of-box drivers ” branch.  The script then imports all drivers found in the source directories to the matching folders in MDT.

All we have to do is extract all drivers for a given computer model into an appropriately named folder in the source directory, and then run the script.

################################################################################
#
#  Create-MDTDriverStructure.ps1
#  J. Greg Mackinnon, University of Vermont, 2013-11-05
#  Creates a folder structure in the "Out of Box Drivers" branch of a MDT 2013
#    deployment share.  The structure matches the first two subdirectories of 
#    the source filesystem defined in $srcRoot.  All drivers contained within
#    $srcRoot are imported into the deployment share.
#
#  Requires: 
#    $srcDir - A driver source directory, 
#    $MDTRoot - a MDT 2013 deployment share
#    - MDT 2013 must be installed in the path noted in $modDir!!!
#
################################################################################

# Define source driver directories:
[string] $srcRoot = 'E:\staging\drivers\import'
[string[]] $sources = gci -Attributes D $srcRoot | `
    Select-Object -Property name | % {$_.name.tostring()}
	
# Initialize MDT Working Environment:
[string] $MDTRoot = 'E:\DevRoot'
[string] $PSDriveName = 'DS100'
[string] $oobRoot = $PSDriveName + ":\Out-Of-Box Drivers"
[string] $modDir = `
	'C:\Program Files\Microsoft Deployment Toolkit\Bin\MicrosoftDeploymentToolkit.psd1'
Import-Module $modDir
New-PSDrive -Name "$PSDriveName" -PSProvider MDTProvider -Root $MDTRoot


foreach ($source in $sources){
    Write-Host "Working with source: " $source -ForegroundColor Magenta
    # Create the OOB Top-level folders:
    new-item -path $oobRoot -name $source -itemType "directory" -Verbose
    # Define a variable for the current working directory:
    $sub1 = $srcRoot + "\" + $source
    # Create an array containing the folders to be imported:
    $items = gci -Attributes D $sub1 | Select-Object -Property name | % {$_.name.tostring()}
    $oobDir = $oobRoot + "\" + $source

    foreach ($item in $items) {
		# Define source and target directories for driver import:
	    [string] $dstDir = $oobDir + "\" + $item
	    [string] $srcDir = $sub1 + "\" + $item
	
	    # Clean up "cruft" files that lead to duplicate drivers in the share:
		Write-Host "Processing $item" -ForeGroundColor Green
	    Write-Host "Cleaning extraneous files..." -ForegroundColor Cyan
        $delItems = gci -recurse -Include version.txt,release.dat,cachescrubbed.txt $srcDir
        Write-Host "Found " $delItems.count " files to delete..." -ForegroundColor Yellow
	    $delItems | remove-Item -force -confirm:$false
        $delItems = gci -recurse -Include version.txt,release.dat,cachescrubbed.txt $srcDir
        Write-Host "New count for extraneous files: " $delItems.count -ForegroundColor Yellow

	    # Create the target directory:
		Write-Host "Creating $item folder" -ForegroundColor Cyan
	    new-item -path $oobDir -name $item -itemType "directory" -Verbose
	
	    # Import all drivers from the source to the new target:
		Write-Host "Importing Drivers for $item" -ForegroundColor Cyan
	    Import-MDTDriver -Path $dstDir -SourcePath $srcDir 
		
        Write-Host "Moving to next directory..." -ForegroundColor Green
		
    } # End ForEach Item
} # End ForEach Source

Remove-PSDrive -Name "$PSDriveName"

 

Rethinking Driver Management in MDT 2013

We have been using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) in LTI/Lite Touch mode here at the University for a long time now.  Why, we used it to deploy XP back when MDT still was called the Business Desktop Deployment Solution Accelerator (BDD).  In this time, we have gone though several different driver management methods.  Gone are the nightmare days of dealing with OEMSETUP files, $OEM$ directories, can elaborate “DriverPack” injection scripts for XP (thank goodness).  

With the release of Vista, we moved from a PnP free-for-all model of driver detection.  After Windows 8.0, we found we really needed to separate our drivers by operating system.  Thus, we created Win7, Win8, and WinPE driver selection profiles.

But now we are finding that driver sprawl is becoming a major issue again.  On many new systems we run though a seemingly successful deployment, but end up with a non-responsive touch screen, a buggy track pad, and (sometimes) a very unstable system.

Starting this week, we are trying a new hybrid driver management approach.  We will create a driver folder for each computer model sold though our computer depot.  I have developed a custom bit of VBScript to check to see if the hardware being deployed to is a known model.  Driver injection will be restricted to this model if a match is found.  The script contains additional logic to detect support for both Windows 7 and Windows 8 variants, and to select the most current drivers detected.  Unknown models will fall back on the PnP free-for-all detection method.

Here is how it works…

  1. Create a new group in your OS deployment task sequence named “Custom Driver Inject”, or something similar.  Grouping all actions together will allow easier transfer of these custom actions to other Task Sequences:
    DM-DriverInjectGroup      
  2. Under this new group, add a new action of type “Set Task Sequence Variable”.  Name the variable “TargetOS”,and set the value to the OS that you are deploying from this task sequence.  You must follow the same naming convention that you use in your Out-of-box driver folder.  I use Win(X), where (X) is the major OS version of the drivers in the folder.  In this example, I have chose “Win8″:
    DM-SetTargetOS
  3. Add an action of type “Run Command Line”.  Name this action “Supported Model Check”.  Under the Command line field, enter “cscript “%SCRIPTROOT%\ZUVMCheckModel.wsf”.  (We will import this script into the deployment share later on.)
    DM-RunModelCheckScript
  4. Add a sub-group named “Supported Model Actions”.  Under the “Options” tab, add a condition of type “Task Sequence Variable”.  Use the variable “SupportedModel”, the Condition “equals”, and the Value “YES”.  (The SupportedModel variable gets set by the CheckModel script run in the previous step.):
    DM-ConditionalGroup
  5. Under this new group, add a new action of type “Set Task Sequence Variable”.  Name this task “Set Variable DriverGroup002″.  Under “Task Sequence Variable”, set “DriverGroup002″, and set the value to “Models\%TargetOS%\%Model%”.  (Note:  You could use “DriverGroup001″, but I already am using this variable to hold a default group of drivers that I want added to all systems.  The value “%TargetOS%\%Model%” defines the path to the driver group in the deployment share.  If you use a different folder structure, you will need to modify this path.):
    DM-SetDriverGroup
  6. Create a new task of type “Inject Drivers”.  Name this task “Inject Model-Specific Drivers”.  For the selection profile, select “Nothing”.  Be sure to select “Install all drivers from the selection profile”.  (NOTE: The dialog implies that we will be injecting only divers from a selection profile.  In fact, this step will inject drivers from any paths defined in any present “DriverGroupXXX” Task Sequence variables.)
    DM-InjectModelDrivers
  7. Now, under our original Custom Driver Inject group, add a new task of type “Inject Drivers”.  Choose from the selection profile “All Drivers”, or use a different fallback selection profile that suits the needs of your task sequence.  This time, select “Install only matching drivers from the selection profile”:
    DM-InjectUnsupported1
    Under the “Options” tab, add the condition where the “Task Sequence Variable” named “Supported Model” equals “NO”:
    DM-InjectUnsupported2
    This step will handle injection of matching drivers into hardware models for which we do not have a pre-defined driver group.
  8. Optionally, you now can open the “CustomSettings.ini” file and add the following to your “Default” section:
         DriverGroup001=Peripherals
    (I have a “Peripherals” driver group configured which contains USB Ethernet drivers used in our environment.  These are a necessity when deploying to hardware that does not have an embedded Ethernet port, such as the Dell XPS 12 and XPS 13.  You also could add common peripherals with complicated drivers such as a DisplayLink docking station or a Dell touch screen monitor.)
  9. Add the “ZUVMCheckMedia.wsf” script to the “Scripts” folder of your deployment share.  The code for this script is included below.  I think the script should be fairly easy to adapt for your environment.
  10. Finally, structure your “Out-of-Box Drivers” folder to contain a “Models” folder, and a single folder for each matching hardware model in your environment.  I get most of our driver collections from Dell:
    http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/enterprise-client/w/wiki/2065.dell-driver-cab-files-for-enterprise-client-os-deployment.aspx
    (NOTE:  Thanks Dell!)
    The real challenge of maintaining this tree is in getting the model names right.  Use “wmic computersystem get model” to discover the model string for any new systems in your environment.  A table of a few current models I have been working with is included below.

Dell Marketing Model Name to WMI Name Translator Table:

  • Dell XPS 12 (first generation) – “XPS 12 9Q23″
  • Dell XPS 12 (second generation) – “XPS 12-9Q33″
  • Dell XPS 13 (first generation) – “Dell System XPS L321X”
  • Dell XPS 13 (second generation) – “Dell System XPS L322X”
  • Dell XPS 14 – “XPS L421Q”
  • Dell Latitude 10 – “Latitude 10 – ST2″
  • VMware Virtual Machine – “VMware Virtual Platform”
  • Microsoft Hyper-V Virtual Machine – “Virtual Machine”

A fun nuance we encountered last week was a Latitude E5430 model that contained “no-vPro” after the model number. Dell does not provide separate driver CABs for vPro/non-vPro models, so I added a regular expression test for Latitudes, and strip any cruft after the model number. There is one more problem down…

The following site contains a list of older model name translations:
http://www.faqshop.com/wp/misc/wmi/list-of-wmic-csproduct-get-name-results
As you can see, most Latitudes and Optiplexes follow sane and predictable model name conventions. I wish the same were true for the XPS.

Finally, I am indebted to the following sources for their generously detailed posts on driver management. Without their help, I doubt I would have been able to make this solution fly:

Jeff Hughes of the Windows Enterprise Support Server Core Team:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askcore/archive/2013/05/09/how-to-manage-out-of-box-drivers-with-the-use-of-model-specific-driver-groups-in-microsoft-deployment-toolkit-2012-update-1.aspx

Andrew Barnes (aka Scriptimus Prime), whose posts on MDT driver management give the basics DriverGroups and model selection:
http://scriptimus.wordpress.com/2013/02/25/ltizti-deployments-injecting-drivers-during-deployment/
AND, of automating driver import into MDT (written for MDT 2012… some changes required for 2013):
http://scriptimus.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/mdt-2012-creating-a-driverstore-folder-structure/

The incredible Michael Neihaus, who in this post discusses the use of DriverGroups and Selection Profiles:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/mniehaus/archive/2009/09/09/mdt-2010-new-feature-19-improved-driver-management.aspx

And finally Eric Schloss of the “Admin Nexus”, who give me the idea of developing a fallback for systems that do not match a known model. It was this key bit of smarts that gave me the confidence to move forward with a model-specific driver grouping strategy:
http://adminnexus.blogspot.com/2012/08/yet-another-approach-to-driver.html

ZUVMCheckModel.wsf script:

(NOTE: WordPress stripped off the WSF headers and footers from my script. These are the first three and last two lines in the script. If you copy from this post, please remember to place greater than and less than tags around these lines before running, as indicated in the comments.)

' Uncomment and wrap each of the following three lines in less than/greater than characters to convert them to tags.
'job id="ZUVMCheckModel"
'script language="VBScript" src="ZTIUtility.vbs"/
'script language="VBScript"

Option Explicit
RunNewInstance

'//--------------------------------------------------------
'// Main Class
'//--------------------------------------------------------
Class ZUVMCheckModel
	
	'//—————————————————————————-
	'//  Constructor to initialize needed global objects
	'//—————————————————————————-
	Private Sub Class_Initialize
	End Sub
	
	'//--------------------------------------------------------
	'// Main routine
	'//--------------------------------------------------------

	Function Main()
	' //*******************************************************
	' //
	' // File: ZTIUVMCheckModel.wsf
	' //
	' // Purpose: Checks the model of this system against
	' //          a list of known machine models.  Returns
	' //          TRUE if a matching model is detected.
	' //
	' // Usage: cscript ZUVMCheckModel.wsf /Model: [/debug:true]
	' //
	' //*******************************************************
	
	'Use the following lines for debugging only.
	'oEnvironment.Item("TargetOS") = "Win7"
	'oEnvironment.item("DeployRoot") = "c:\local\mdt"
	'oEnvironment.Item("Model") = "Latitude E6500 some annoying variation"
	'End debug Params

	  Dim aModels()          'Array of models taken from DriverGroups.xml
	  Dim bOldDrivers        'Boolean indicating drivers present for an older OS version
	  Dim i                  'Generic integer for looping
	  Dim j                  'Generic integer for looping
	  Dim iRetVal            'Return code variable
	  Dim iMaxOS             'Integer representing the highest matching OS driver store
	  Dim oRegEx
	  Dim oMatch
	  Dim match
	  Dim oXMLDoc            'XML Document Object, for reading DriverGroups.xml
	  Dim Root,NodeList,Elem 'Objects in support of oXMLdoc
	  Dim sDGPath            'Path to DriverGroups.xml file
	  Dim sInitModel         'String representing the initial value of
	                         '   oEnvironment.Item("Model")
	  Dim sItem	             'Item in aModels array.
	  Dim sMaxOS             'OS Name of highest matching OS driver store
	  Dim sOSFound           'OS Name for a given matching driver set.
	  
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "Begin ZUVMCheckModel...", LogTypeInfo
	  
	  'Set the default values:
	  oEnvironment.Item("SupportedModel") = "NO"
	  iMaxOS = CInt(Right(oEnvironment.Item("TargetOS"),1))
	  'wscript.echo "Default value for iMaxOS = " & iMaxOS
	  bOldDrivers = false
	  sInitModel = oEnvironment.Item("Model")
	  'wscript.echo "sInitModel value = " & sInitModel
	  
	  Set oRegEx = New RegExp
	  oRegEx.Global = True
	  oRegEx.IgnoreCase = True
	  
	  'Modify the detected model name to handle known variations:
	  oRegEx.pattern = "Latitude"
	  if oRegEx.test(sInitModel) then
		oLogging.CreateEntry "Model is a Latitude.  Cleaning up the model name...", LogTypeInfo
		oRegEx.pattern = " "
		set oMatch = oRegEx.Execute(sInitModel)
		'wscript.echo "oMatch Count is: " & oMatch.count
		if oMatch.Count > 1 then
			i = oMatch.item(1).FirstIndex
			oEnvironment.Item("Model") = Left(sInitModel,i)
			'wscript.echo """"&oEnvironment.Item("Model")&""""
		end if
	  end if

	  'Check for DriverGroups.xml file, which will contain the supported model list:
	  iRetVal = Failure
	  iRetVal = oUtility.FindFile("DriverGroups.xml", sDGPath)
	  if iRetVal  Success then
		oLogging.CreateEntry "DriverGroups file not found. ", LogTypeError
		exit function
	  end if 
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "Path to DriverGroups.xml: " & sDGPath, LogTypeInfo
	  
	  'Parse the DriverGroups.xml file:
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "Parsing DriverGroups.xml...", LogTypeInfo
	  Set oXMLDoc = CreateObject("Msxml2.DOMDocument") 
	  oXMLDoc.setProperty "SelectionLanguage", "XPath"
	  oXMLDoc.load(sDGPath)
	  Set Root = oXMLDoc.documentElement 
	  Set NodeList = Root.getElementsByTagName("Name")
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "NodeList Member Count is: " & NodeList.length, LogTypeInfo
	  'oLogging.CreateEntry "NodeList.Length variant type is: " & TypeName(NodeList.Length), LogTypeInfo
	  i = CInt(NodeList.length) - 1
	  ReDim aModels(i) 'Resize aModels to hold all matching DriverGroup items.
	  'oLogging.CreateEntry "List of Available Driver Groups:", LogTypeInfo
	  i = 0
	  For Each Elem In NodeList
		if InStr(Elem.Text,"Models\") then
			aModels(i) = Mid(Elem.Text,8)	'Add text after "Models\"
			'oLogging.CreateEntry aModels(i), LogTypeInfo
			i = i + 1
		end if
	  Next
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "End Parsing DriverGroups.xml.", LogTypeInfo

	  'Loop through the list of supported models to find a match:
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "Checking discovered driver groups for match to: " & oenvironment.Item("Model"), LogTypeInfo
	  For Each sItem in aModels
		oLogging.CreateEntry "Checking Driver Group: " & sItem, LogTypeInfo
		i = InStr(1, sItem, oEnvironment.Item("Model"), vbTextCompare)

		'wscript.echo TypeName(i) 'i is a "Long" number type.
		If i  0 Then
			oLogging.CreateEntry "Matching Model found.", LogTypeInfo
			
			j = InStr(sItem,"\")
			sOSFound = Left(sItem,j-1)
			'wscript.echo "sOSFound = " & sOSFound 
			if (InStr(1,sOSFound,oEnvironment.Item("TargetOS"),vbTextCompare)  0) then
				oLogging.CreateEntry "Drivers matching the requested OS are available.  Exiting with success.", LogTypeInfo
				oEnvironment.Item("SupportedModel") = "YES"
				iRetVal = Success
				Main = iRetVal
				Exit Function
			end if
			if iMaxOS > CInt(Right(sOSFound,1)) then
				iMaxOS = CInt(Right(sOSFound,1))
				'wscript.echo "iMaxOS = " & iMaxOS
				sMaxOS = sOSFound
				bOldDrivers = true
				'wscript.echo "sMaxOS = " & sMaxOS
			end if
		End If
	  Next
		
	  If bOldDrivers Then 'Run if sMaxOS is defined... set a boolean when this is defined and test against that?
		oLogging.CreateEntry "Model drivers were found for an OS older than the one selected...", LogTypeWarning
		oEnvironment.Item("SupportedModel") = "YES"
		oEnvironment.Item("TargetOS") = sMaxOS
	  Else
	    oLogging.CreateEntry "No matching drivers were found for this model.", LogTypeInfo
	  End If
	  
	  oLogging.CreateEntry "End ZUVMCheckModel.", LogTypeInfo

	  iRetVal = Success
	  Main = iRetVal

	End Function

End Class

' Uncomment and wrap each of the following two lines in less than/greater than characters to convert them to tags.
'/script
'/job

LiteTouch failures on UEFI systems

Today I got a complaint that a user could not deploy Windows 8 on a UEFI-enabled computer (a Latitude 10 tablet, to be precise) using our MDT 2012 Update 1 deployment share (in Lite Touch mode, of course).  At the same time, I was experiencing problems deploying Windows 8 on a Dell XPS 14 with UEFI firmware enabled.  Interestingly, the deployment problem did not occur when running with Legacy BIOS enabled.  What gives?

The error reported by Lite Touch was: “MDT FAILURE (5616): Verify BCDbootex”.  Much digging though the logs revealed the command line that triggered the problem (It was spelled out in the “LTIApply.log”).  This command was something like:
\\server\deployShare\Tools\x64\bcdboot c:\windows /l en-us /s v: /f UEFI

If I try to run the command above manually, I just get back the bcdboot.exe help dialog.  Further investigation revealed that the version of bcdboot.exe on the server share is dated to 2009.  This is the Windows 7 RTM release version!

I created a new deployment share to see if the bad version of bcdboot.exe gets placed there again… it did not.  So, I removed bcdboot.exe from the deployment share (along with an old version of ImageX.exe and some other expired utilities).  Upon re-running LiteTouch, deployment succeeds.  Both Windows 7 and Windows 8 boot media contain bcdboot.exe in the search path… no server side copy is required.  I wonder how it got there in the first place?  Maybe we were trying to make it easier for people to capture system images using the LiteTouch boot media.  Another entry for the department of unintended consequences…

Dell XPS 12 – The Windows 8 Flagship?

Regular readers of my blog (all two of you) may recall the “series” I started this fall on Windows 8 launch devices (concerning the HP Envy X2 and the Samsung SmartPC Pro 700t). These devices both had strengths, but failed in other ways that made them difficult or impossible to support in an enterprise environment. This month, I got my hands on a device that breaks though that barrier and satisfies in a big way. The new Dell XPS 12 finally arrived on our campus about two weeks ago. We immediately were taken with its light weight (3 lbs.), sleek styling, and novel materials (full carbon fiber base, carbon fiber and aluminum lid, and that unique flip-over touch screen). The 8-second boot time is another impressive feature. A longer battery life would have been appreciated, but I can live with it. Other helpful enhancements would be the inclusion of an active stylus. I also would appreciate slightly more resistance in the keyboard.

Others have weighed in on the appearance, performance, and usability of this fancy Ultrabook, though, so I will forgo further commentary on those aspects of the XPS 12. What most concerned us was the ability to support OS redeployment, BitLocker encryption, and hardware servicing on our Campus.

We unboxed and re-deployed the computer with Windows 8 Enterprise within one day. There were a few deployment hiccoughs, but in general re-deployment was what we have come to expect from Dell. All required drivers for the XPS 12 were made available in a single downloadable CAB file. We extracted this CAB to our MDT/LiteTouch Deployment Share, rebuilt our boot media, and initiated a LiteTouch deployment. There was a brief problem getting LiteTouch to start… we needed to disable the “Safe Boot” option in EFI/BIOS, and we needed to set the EFI boot mode to “Legacy” to allow our boot media to operate. Once those changes were made, the XPS 12 booted to our USB WinPE media without complaint. Upon completion of deployment, all devices in the device manager reported as functioning. There were no “poorly-behaved” drivers that required un-scripted installation. We did find that the track-pad was behaving strangely. Investigation revealed that the PnP process had grabbed a Windows 7 track-pad driver from our deployment share. We corrected this manually, then separated our Windows 8 drivers from our Windows 7 drivers in the Deployment Workbench… this should prevent the problem from recurring in future deployments.

BitLocker was easy to implement. The TPM chip readily was recognized by the OS, and TPM-with-PIN encryption was accomplished in minutes. I spent half a day trying to encrypt an older Dell Latitude E6500 a few months back. This was a breeze by comparison.

On the servicing front, we have good news. Dell now is allowing on-site servicing for all XPS models, with full reimbursement for parts and labor for qualified technicians. Physical serviceability is a big concern for newer Ultrabooks. A troubling trend in tablet and notebook design is the use of solder on drive mounts and glue to hold batteries in place (the latest “Retina” MacBooks and the MS Surface tablets suffer from these problems). Fortunately, it appears that all major components of the XPS 12 can be removed and replaced without the need to re-solder or remove glue. The most frequently swapped components such as the battery, mSATA drive, and memory chips look pretty easy to access. The keyboard is a bit of a pain to get to, but at least it can be serviced.

If only more Windows 8 launch products had been this good… I hope we see more products of this quality coming from Dell (and other vendors) in the near future.

Update:  2013-11-1

Five months into using the XPS 12, I started to have trouble with the trackpad.  It would not click anymore!  Since we are working with an evaluation unit, I do not have warranty coverage, so I figured I had no warranty to void by attempting to repair it on my own.

Some digging in the Dell support site revealed that the so-called XPS 12 “User Manual” is actually a service manual!  The readily available PDF document illustrates step-by step how to remove the carbon fiber base plate and the battery in order to get to the track pad.  (The only challenging part was locating a #5 Torx screwdriver to take off the base plate.)  Within 15 minutes I had removed the click pad, and cleaned the trapped grit out from under it.  (Within a half hour I had the unit re-assembled.  In another 15 minutes I had taken the base plate back off, reconnected the battery power connector, and re-attached the base plate, again.)  The unit powered back on as normal, with the track pad working like new.

At a time when consumer devices are moving towards non-serviceable designs (think MacBook Retina), it is nice to see a device that is thin and light while still maintaining serviceability.  Perhaps the track pad on the MacBook Retina is less prone to trapping grit, but imagine if it did?  With all the components glued together, you might be out $2000 because of a bit of sand.  I really have to hand it to Dell.  These XPS Ultrabooks are really nicely engineered.

 

Evaluating Windows 8 Tablets – Samsung ATIV SmartPC Pro (700T)

The journey continues…

The boss approved purchase of a Samsung ATIV SmartPC Pro (the “700T” model).  I wassoooexcited… this was the tablet PC I had been waiting for.  Thin, light, and fully convertible from Ultrabook to slate.  Stylus included, 1080 high-definition display, full Intel i5 processor.  So much to love…

First impressions were really positive.  The build quality seemed really high… solid magnesium case, good keyboard response, fast boot, very responsive Wacom digitizer stylus.  As a tablet, this thing is awesome. And while it is expensize compared to an iPad, it is very cheap compared to the Tablet PCs of yesteryear.

However, I quickly ran into trouble.  When typing with the SmartPC on my lap, the keyboard would frequently disconnect from the display.  It would not fall off, but the tablet component would lose electrical connection to the keyboard, causing typing input to stop.  Sometimes this would happen as often as five times in a single line of text.  Awful!

There were other problems as well.  Like the HP Envy X2, the screen does not tilt back far enough to allow comfortable use of the keyboard on a countertop.  The 1080p display, which is very crisp and bright, is inconvenient to use for remote desktop connections to Server 2008 R2 and earlier hosts (the fonts do not scale for remote desktop sessions, leading to comically tiny print size and rediculiously small buttons and window controls).  The system did not include a TPM chip (that is only available on the models that ship with Win8 Pro… something that was not clear when ordering the device).  And finally, Samsung does not bundle drivers for the SmartPC in any way that is convenient for business deployment.  Re-imaging the systems would be a pain.

It also is worth noting that Microsoft decided that in-place upgrades of retail versions of Win 8 to volume license editions woudl not be supported.  If you want simply to install Win 8 Enterprise over the factory-shipped consumer edition of Win8, you are out of luck.  I also experienced this problem with the HP Envy X2.  For corporate users, volume license installs are strictly a nuke-and-repave operation.  Booooooo!  This is not Samsung’s fault, but the lack of support for business deployment (i.e. driver bundles or driver repository building tools) is a killer for the SmartPC in the enterprise.

I really wanted to love this device, but I really just have to return it.  Consumers seeking a top-performance tablet may love it, but it does not work for this sysadmin.  I am hoping that the Lenovo ThinkPad Helix will work out better.

Evaluating Windows 8 Tablets in the Enterprise – HP Envy X2

In desperation over our inability to tell University employees what they should be looking for in a Windows 8 tablet, I asked the boss if we could get our hands on one of the new Intel “Atom” processor-based Windows 8 tablets (these are the “Clover Trail” Atom processors, designed to compete with ARM-based devices).  I had been wanting to eval a Samsung ATIV Smart PC 500T, but these have been hard to get locally.  Instead, I bought a hot-off-the-shelf HP Envy X2.  This device boasts a well-engineered all-metal shell, full size keyboard dock with full-sized HDMI and SD card readers, and an extra battery in the dock for a claimed 15-hour run life.  It also claims to support an optional digitizer stylus.

I only have just started putting the machine though its paces.  My first impression is that it performs surprisingly well as a standard notebook, but that there will be significant challenges in supporting these types of devices at the same level as our existing business-model Dell systems.  I am not going to bother “reviewing” this tablet… others in the trade can handle that.  Rather, this blog post is going to address the challenges of supporting a consumer tablet in a business environment.

  • Processor:  The new “Clover Trail” Atom processors are 32-bit only.  Surprise!  I though the industry was leaving 32-bt behind, but it appears to be alive and well.  We had made the initial decision to support only 64-bit Windows 8, and have developed only 64-bit baseline images.  I see that this choice will need to be reconsidered.
  • EFI/UEFI:  These new systems boot using EFI, with emulated BIOS, with the “SafeBoot” option enabled.  Out of the box, you cannot boot to USB because the SafeBoot prohibits this.  You need to load your OS to change EFI options.  EFI is not identical between systems, so navigating the process of booting to deployment/maintenance media will be a tough challenge for technicians to work through.  I actually was completely unable to boot the Envy X2 to an USB flash drive, running either WinPE (MDT boot media) or the FreeDOS-based(?) CloneZilla  live CD.  Bummer.
  • Drivers:  Most new tablets are aimed at the consumer market.  As a result, the vendors make little effort to package drivers in a way that is convenient for local IT staff to integrate into on-premise Windows deployment tools.  The Envy X2 is no exception.  A small handful of one-off driver installers are available, including a big bundle of Intel Chipset drivers.  The chipset drivers were critical in getting a freshly installed Windows 8 Enterprise OS working with the hardware.
  • Windows Editions:  This tablet shipped with “Windows 8″.  Not “Home”, not “Professional”, not “Ultimate”.  I tried performing an in-place SKU upgrade to Windows 8 Enterprise, but setup.exe said that this was not supported, so I needed to do a full OS install.  This process worked, but it was seriously aggravating to have to boot to the OEM OS, start the Enterprise OS install, re-install all of the required drivers, then clean up the original OS install.  Our users will not want to have to deal with this, and it will make our IT support staff very tired.
  • Hardware:  No Ethernet.  Unfortunately, our MDT/LTI deployment tools are designed to run over Ethernet, not Wi-Fi.  The LTI scripts actually will terminate if a Wi-Fi connection is detected.  Of course, application-only LTI task sequences really should run just fine over wireless, but the scripts still will not run over wireless.  We either will have to comment out the Wi-Fi checks, or require that the person launching LTI have a USB Ethernet dongle handy.

So… a lot of challenges.  More details as time permits.

Oh, one small “review style” note.  I decided to evaluate this tablet because HP claims that it supports an optional stylus.  However, the stylus for this device is not actually available for sale at this time.  Further, the device does not use the common Wacom or N-Trig digitizers, so buying a spare “Bamboo” stylus will not help you here.  HP has chosen to use the new “Atmel” integrated touch/pen sensors, and as such an Atmel-compatible stylus is required.  I cannot find these on the market anywhere.  As a result I cannot make any recommendation for or against the purchase of this device for Tablet PC enthusiasts.  I don’t even know if the stylus will be available for sale before the return period for this device expires.

UPDATE:

I returned this tablet.  Why?  It was not the screen resolution, which I though would be a problem but was not.  There were three primary reasons:

  1. It was not possible to determine the quality of the digitizer within the return period of the tablet.  I was unwilling to accept the risk of having a low-quality stylus for note taking.
  2. Keyboard dock quality was low.  The keyboard itself was reasonably good, but the trackpad was very annoying.  The texture was awful, and it was overly sensitive to the slightest palm brushes.  Given the small size of the keyboard deck, it was impossible to avoid brushing the trackpad, too.  Also, the screen did not tip back far enough for comfort when used on a countertop or other waist-height surface.
  3. Business deployment essentially was unsupportable.  HP support could not assist me with initialization of the TPM chip for BitLocker.  It appeared that a TPM was present, but there was no option in BIOS to reset the TPM, and the OS could not get ownership of the chip.  Also, the total lack of driver bundles would make deployment using MDT very difficult.
  4. The graphics card could not drive my external display at native resolution.  It maxed out at 1080p.

I did quite like this tablet, though.  Consumers seeking an additional computer for the road may really enjoy using it.  For fussy power users like me, it was close butnot quite there.

The Mysterious Case of the Un-Deletable MBR (Or, More Reasons to Hate PGP)

Shortly after releasing MDT 2012 on the general public I got a call from a colleague who told me that his LiteTouch deployment was failing.  He was able to boot to LiteTouch media, go though the configuration wizard, and initiate setup.  LiteTouch would partition the drive, Windows Setup would start, the image would get written to the computer, and then the system would reboot… so far so good. What happened next was unexpected.  The computer booted to the PGP BootGuard screen.

Turns out we were dealing with a system that had been encrypted using PGP Whole Disk Encryption. However, we have a lot of those, and deployment has not failed on them before.  In the past, LiteTouch dutifully has erased the Master Boot Record (MBR) and all existing partition tables on the system, effectively wiping PGP BootGuard from the machine before running Windows Setup.

So what changed?  Is this a bug in MDT 2012?  Something new in PGP Desktop version 10.2.0 MP4?  Or a configuration problem in our LiteTouch environment.

Let’s omit the details of ~6 hours of troubleshooting… it was a change in the WinPE LiteTouch environment, and PGP.  It appears, though investigation, that the PGP filter drivers attempt to block access to the MBR of the hard drive.  Since I had injected PGP drivers into the LiteTouch 32-bit boot media, I had, effectively created a situation where DiskPart.exe would be unable to remove PGP BootGuard from the system.  The really irritating part is that the PGP drivers do not pass any indication to the Windows utilities that there has been an error writing to the MBR.  DiskPart.exe, BootSect.exe, and the DaRT Disk Commander all can be used to repair MBRs.  But when used in a PGP-enabled environment they all report success in manipulating the disk MBR, but all of them fail to make any real change to the true MBR.  How do you usually erase a drive?  For me, I would run “diskpart.exe, select disk 0, clean”.  With PGP drivers in place, you could run this series of commands, think that you had erased the drive, but still end up with PGP BootGuard in your MBR.  It really is maddening.

Symantec/PGP claim that you can remove the MBR data by “deinstrumenting” the disk using the “pgpwde.exe” command.  The problem with this is, pgpwde will not let you deinstrument an encrypted drive.  So, you would have to decrypt the drive first, then deinstrument.  I am not wasting time on that.  Worse yet, if your drive was partially encrypted when you erased the data partition, PGPWDE still reports the drive status as “partially encrypted”, and refuses to perform any actions on the drive (such as “deinstrument”) until the current encryption (on the nonexistent drive) completes.  AARGH!

Fortunately, I was able to find a low-level disk manipulation utility that actually works in 32-bit PGP-enabled WinPE environments.  PlDD.exe:

http://home.comcast.net/~plavarre/plscsi/tools/pldd/

There are other “DD” equivalents for Windows.  Most of them either fail to work against PGP (GnuWin32 DD.exe and the Crysocome DD), or will not function under WinPE (FAU DD).  PlDD is pretty old, and it does not work under 64-bit Windows.  But, we don’t need 64-bit support (PGP does not provide 64-bit drivers for WinPE!), it works perfectly in 32-bit Windows.  Thus, this is the perfect tool for the time being.

Getting the right command syntax to pldd.exe was a bit challenging as the tool itself has scarce documentation.  I wish I could credit all of the resources that I used to put this dense command together, but I have since lost the browser tabs.  The following is the pldd.exe command, suitable for plugging into an MDT task sequence as a custom command:

cmd.exe /c “%SCRIPTROOT%\Pldd.exe if of=\\.\PhysicalDrive0 bs=512 count=1″

Argument breakdown:

  • if = In File.  In this version of DD, if provided with parameters, will use a string of zeros as input.
  • of = Out file.  In this case, we are using the Windows device path “\\.\PhysicalDrive0″, which is fixed disk zero.  I think this device path is referenced in the gnuwin32 dd docs.
  • bs = Block size.  We are choosing to write in 512 byte blocks.
  • count = The number of blocks to write.  We are going to write one 512 byte block to the “out file”.

To summarize, we use pldd to write 512 bytes of zeros to the start of physical drive zero.  This action wipes out the MBR and the disk signature of the drive (sorry, I lost my reference for this factoid, too).  Zeroing 512 bytes of disk is rather faster than zeroing the entire drive, which is the only other option I have seen referenced in the tubes for fixing this issue.

Share and Enjoy.

MDT 2012 – Taking LiteTouch Offline

I decided to give some of my user base something that they have been asking for for a long time… the ability to run MDT/LiteTouch deployments entirely from removable storage media. I had avoided doing this in the past as we made significant use of the MDT database in selecting hardware-specific support applications (such as Dell QuickSet).  However, with MDT 2012 (and the general deprecation of hardware-specific support software under Windows 7), I have decided to abandon the MDT database.  This makes generation of offline MDT media much more feasible.

“I should be able to get this done in a few hours!”, I thought.  Ha!  Four days later…

Gotchas in adding LiteTouch Offline media to a previously online-only environment:

Expiring stale media:

One of the leading arguments we make to persuade users to adopt the use of LiteTouch is that “we keep it up to date for you”.  What about offline media?  How to we ensure that that stays current?  One of the Brad Tucker, Deployment Guy, has a solution for that:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/deploymentguys/archive/2012/02/15/expiring-outdated-stand-alone-media.aspx

The problem there is that his script was developed for the SCCM ZTI scenatio, not LiteTouch.  However, with a little work I was able to adapt his script for use in LiteTouch.  The script body is available below.  To run it, I needed to modify the “winpeshl.ini” file in %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Deployment Toolkit\Templates as follows:

[LaunchApps]
%SYSTEMROOT%\System32\wscript.exe,X:\Deploy\Scripts\ZUVMExpiredMediaCheck.vbs
%SYSTEMROOT%\System32\bddrun.exe,/bootstrap

The script referenced above (ZUVMExpiredMediaCheck.vbs) needs to be defined in the “Extra Directory to Include” field in the WinPE section of the Media set in the Deployment Workbench.  You need to include the “\Deploy\Scripts” folder structure in the Extras directory, too.

WinRE installation problems:

Since deploying MDT 2012, I finally worked though the problem of including both WinRE and MS DaRT tools into the LiteTouch boot media, and in the WinRE environment installed with the operating system.  However, with offline media the inclusion we would not want to copy the LiteTouch WinPE instance to disk.  Two reasons.  Firstly, the OS Deployment option simply would not work (Offline media would not be available), and secondly, we just included a script to disable the media.  To solve this problem, I needed to set the “PrepareWinRE” Property in the CustomSettings.ini file for the media set to “NO”.

MS DaRT Integration Problem:

When testing LiteTouch from a fully offline machine, I started to get a “network connection not available” error pop up at seemingly random places after starting up the boot media.  Eventually I realized that the error was coming from the DaRT Remote Connection tool that starts up with WinPE.  While this error does not cause any problems with actual deployment, I don’t want it causing end-user panic, so I decided to see if I could disable the feature.  According to documentation, I need to generate a “DartConfig.DAT” file using the DaRT configuration tool.  DartConfig.DAT is a binary configuration file (not plain text).  It’s options are not documented anywhere, so you really do have to run the GUI tool to generate a new DAT.  You then are supposed to drop the DAT file into “%ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Deployment Toolkit\Templates”, and update your boot media.  A few problems with this:

  1. If you want different configuration files installed into your WinPE instances, you will either to switch out the DartConfig.dat in the Templates directory each time you update boot media, or run the updates from a different MDT instance, or edit the LiteTouch boot WIM files each time you update the boot media.  There is no way to specify different DartConfig.dat files per deployment share or media set.
  2. The Deployment Workbench does not consistently insert the DartConfig.dat file into the LiteTouch boot media.  If you update your DartConfig.dat in the Templates directory, then update your boot media, there is no guarantee that your DartConfig.dat will get updated.  The only sure-fire way to get a new DartConfig in your deployment share seems to be to force regeneration of the boot media (i.e. you need to throw out your existing boot WIM files, not update them).  The situation is worse with offline media sets.  Rather the workbench will copy any existing boot WIMs from the root deployment share to serve as a baseline image when generating offline boot images.  Thus, to update DartConfig.dat in a media set, you need to delete both the root share boot WIMs, and the offline boot WIMs prior to updating media.
  3. You might think that you could work around that whole one-template-per-workbench problem by including a per-media-set DartConfig.dat in the “Extras” folder that you can optionally include in each media set or deployment share.  After all, the media update procedure appears to add the extras after the templates.  But if you did think this, you would be wrong.  The update apparently will not overwrite existing files within the source WIM.
  4. You might, out of sheer desperation, decided to remove DaRT from the offline boot media  by deselecting the component from the WinPE properties of the media set.  This also will fail.  The workbench will report that “DaRT cannot be removed from the media.  Use the -Force option to regenerate the media.”  Presumably the error is suggesting that you should add “-force” to the Update-MDTMedia PowerShell Cmdlet that is used to update the media set.  Sadly, “-Force” is not a valid flag for this cmdlet.

Ultimately, I just used imagex to mount the LiteTouch Offline boot media, and switched out the DartConfig.dat file using a simple “copy” command.  Now I just need to remember to do that every time.

UserExit Script – Required Modifications:

Back in 2008 I added a UserExit script to LiteTouch to generate a semi-unique computer name by taking the last eight characters of the computer’s MAC address, then appending a hyphen and a date string.  It turns out that the routine in MDT that captures the MAC address (presumably ZTIGather.vbs) will not succeed unless the computer has a functional Ethernet connection.  Grrr… When testing LiteTouch offline, we were getting computer names like “Address%-1214″.  Percent characters are not valid in computer names  so, I needed to update our UserExit to use other semi-unique system attributes such as “Serial Number” to “Asset Tag” if the MAC is not available.  I also added a fallback string of “UVMLT” if none of those variables are found.  The new script is available below, along with a sample call to the script from CustomSettings.ini.


' // ****************************************************************************
' // File:      ZUVMExpiredMediaCheck.vbs
' // Version:   1.0
' // Purpose:   Check to see if stand-alone media is expired
' // Actions:   Shuts down WinPE if media is older than iExpAge variable months
' //            Otherwise, script exits with Return 0.
' // Usage:     cscript/wscript ZUVMExpiredMediaCheck.vbs
' //            (to be added to winpeshl.ini, before bddrun.exe)
' // ****************************************************************************
Option Explicit

' // Declare Variables:
Dim cFiles
Dim dtCreationDate, dtEndDate, dtXMonthsAgo
Dim iExpAge
Dim oDiskDrive, oDrives, oExec, oFile, oFSO, oShell, oWMIService
Dim sCommand, sComputer, sExpText, sSysRoot, sUSBPath

' // Initialize Variables:
' Media Expiration Age, in months:
iExpAge = 4

' // -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' // Function: Converts the WMI date query response to a simple date format.  (e.g. 09/21/2010)
Function WMIDateStringToDate(dtmInstallDate)
	WMIDateStringToDate = CDate(Mid(dtmInstallDate, 5, 2) & "/" & Mid(dtmInstallDate, 7, 2) _
	& "/" & Left(dtmInstallDate, 4) & " " & Mid(dtmInstallDate, 9, 2) & ":" _
	& Mid(dtmInstallDate, 11, 2) & ":" & Mid(dtmInstallDate, 13, 2))
End Function
' // -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' // Find the environment variable %SYSTEMROOT% for location of LiteTouch Executables.
Set oShell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
sSysRoot = oShell.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%SYSTEMROOT%")
' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

' // --------------------------------
' // Find driver letter for USB Media
Set oFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Set oDrives = oFSO.Drives
For Each oDiskDrive In oDrives
	If oDiskDrive.DriveType = "1" Then
		sUSBPath = oDiskDrive.Path
	End If
Next
' // --------------------------------

' // -------------------------------------------------------------------------
' // Media Check - Check for Applications.xml presence and age.
sComputer = "."
Set oWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:" & "{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" & sComputer & "\root\cimv2")
' Query WMI for creation date of the Applications.xml file on the USB Drive:
'    NOTE: Do not add the wbemFlagForwardOnly (Decimal 32) flag to this query.  While the query would run faster
' with the flag, we also will not be able test for empty queries.
Set cFiles = oWMIService.ExecQuery("Select * From CIM_DataFile Where Name = '" & sUSBPath & "\\Deploy\\Control\\Applications.xml'")
' // -------------------------------------------------------------------------

' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' // If Applications.xml file is not present, this is not offline media.  Exit script.
if cFiles.Count = 0 then
	Wscript.Quit(0)
end if
' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' // If the Applications.xml file creation date is more than "iExpAge" months ago, shutdown WinPE.
For Each oFile in cFiles
	dtCreationDate = WMIDateStringToDate(oFile.CreationDate)
	dtEndDate = DateAdd("m", iExpAge, dtCreationDate)
	' Set the date iExpAge months ago from today
	dtXMonthsAgo = DateAdd("m", -iExpAge, Now)
	If dtCreationDate < dtXMonthsAgo then
		' Expiration Text, to be displayed to the user if older than iExpAge months:
		sExpText = "This LiteTouch Offline Media expired on: " & dtEndDate & chr(13) _
			& "Refresh your media using the README file located here:" & chr(13) _
			& "\\files.uvm.edu\software\Windows_Deployment_Services"
		MsgBox sExpText,vbMsgBoxSetForeground,"Expired Media"
		'Shutdown WinPE immediately:
		sCommand = sSysRoot & "\system32\wpeutil.exe shutdown"
		set oExec = oShell.Exec(sCommand)
	Else
		' If the media is fresh, run LiteTouch Offline.
		WScript.Quit(0)
	End If
Next
' // ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

' // ZUVMUserExit.vbs
' // Custom Function library for use with the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit
' // Currently includes "GenUniComp" - a function for generating unique computer names

' code adapted from source content:
'   http://blogs.technet.com/benhunter/archive/2007/03/17/understanding-bdd-rule-processing.aspx

Function UserExit(sType, sWhen, sDetail, bSkip)
	UserExit = Successfs
End Function

Function GenSimDate(sSimDate)
	'Generates a simple date string in the format of YYMMDD
	Dim dNow, sYear, sMonth, sDay
	dNow = Date()
	sYear = Right(cStr(Year(dNow)), 2)
	sMonth = cStr(Month(dNow))
	sDay = cStr(Day(dNow))
	GenSimDate = sYear + sMonth + sDay
End Function

Function CleanMac(sMac)
	'Strips colon (:) characters from the variable passed to this function.  The passed variable is presumed to be a Mac address.
	Dim oRegExp
	Set oRegExp = new RegExp
	oRegExp.IgnoreCase = true
	oRegExp.Global = true
	oRegExp.Pattern = ":"
	CleanMac = oRegExp.Replace(sMac, "")
End Function

Function GenUniComp(sMac,sSerial,sATag)
	'Generates a hopefully unique computer name by:
	'   Selecting from available MacAddress, SerialNumber, or Asset Tag then
	'   triming the right eight digits from the value and appending a hyphen with the current date.
	Dim sSimDate, sUniVal
	oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: sMac value in UserExit script is: " & sMac,LogTypeInfo
	oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: sSerial value in UserExit script is: " & sSerial,LogTypeInfo
	oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: sATag value in UserExit script is: " & sATag,LogTypeInfo
	if InStr(sMac,"%Mac") = 0 then
		oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Using Mac Address to generate computer name",LogTypeInfo
		sMac = CleanMac(sMac)
		oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Cleaned sMac values now is: " & sMac,LogTypeInfo
		sUniVal = sMac
	elseif InStr(sSerial,"%Serial") = 0 then
		oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Using Serial Number to generate computer name.",LogTypeInfo
		sUniVal = sSerial
	elseif InStr(sATTag,"%Asset") = 0 then
		oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Using Asset Tag to generate computer name.",LogTypeInfo
		sUniVal = sATag
	else
		oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Using Fallback Computer Name",LogTypeInfo
		sUniVal = "UVMLT"
	end if
	oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: sUniVal now set to: " & sUniVal,LogTypeInfo
	sSimDate = GenSimDate(sSimDate)
	GenUniComp = Right(sUniVal, 8) + "-" + sSimDate
	oLogging.CreateEntry "ZUVMUserExit: Unique Computer Name will be: " & GenUniComp,LogTypeInfo
End Function

Calling the GenUniComp function from CustomSettings.ini:

ComputerName=#GenUniComp("%MacAddress%","%SerialNumber%","%AssetTag%")#

MDT 2012 – The Ultimate WinPE Boot Media

This week I went to rebuild our MS DaRT Emergency Rescue Disk media.  While looking into the available tools to automate injection of our LiteTouch / MDT Deployment Workbench driver store into the DaRT boot media, I discovered something interesting in the MDT 2012 RC1 release notes… MDT 2012 supports the addition of DaRT into the LiteTouch boot media.  Once complete, you will have boot media that will support LiteTouch deployment, Standard WinRE recovery tools, and MS DaRT tools.  Too cool!  Some hours of work and a few gotchas later, it is done.  My LiteTouch media contains LiteTouch scripts, WinRE, DaRT, and PGP command line utilities.  Best of all, rebuilding of the media is sustainable.  Here is how it is done:

  1. Making WinRE available in LiteTouch boot media:
    In the Operating Systems section of the workbench, create a DEV folder.  Add to this one operating system with source files for each architecture that you need boot media for (i.e. amd64 and x86).  The OS version must match the version of WinPE used by the AIK on your build system.  (e.g. If you are using the Windows 7 AIK, you need current Windows 7 sources in the deployment share.)  To avoid trouble, make sure that these are the only operating systems with source files for this version of the AIK (e.g. You can have Vista source files if you need them, but keep only one Win 7 source so you will know which boot.wim is being used to generate your LiteTouch media).
  2. Adding DaRT:
    Follow the directions in the MDT help to install and activate the DaRT tools into the deployment share.
    In the deployment share CustomSettings.ini, set the variable:
    PrepareWinRE=YES
    This will insure that the workbench will generate a combined WinRE/DaRT image.
  3. Adding PGP:
    To make PGP tools available, use the PGPPE tools to apply pgpwde.exe to the boot.wim in the 32-bit operating system source files that you created in step 1, as follows:
    pgppe.exe /vista [pathToOSSource] [pathToPGPFiles]
    This will install PGP tools into both the Windows Setup and WinPE images in the stock boot.wim.  When you generate LiteTouch media from the Workbench, the PGP tools already will be present.
    Documentation on the use of PGPPE can be found here:
    http://www.symantec.com/business/support/index?page=content&id=HOWTO64225&actp=search&viewlocale=en_US&searchid=1332275738030
    and here:
    http://www.symantec.com/business/support/index?page=content&id=TECH149634
    (The first article contains corrections to the second article.  Note that PGPPE now is part of a standard PGP Desktop install, and does not need to be downloaded separately).

Of course, there is a lot more going on with MDT 2012 than just boot media changes… more on that later.

Time Sync Scripts… updated for MDT 2010/LiteTouch

Update: Although the scripts in this post work, a correction is required for time to sync properly in the winPE environment. An updated WinPE script can be found here:
http://blog.uvm.edu/jgm/2010/10/14/time-sync-in-mdt-2010winpe-take-3/

With some help from the indispensable MDT Debugger, I have managed to get my quick Time Sync VBScript into MDT 2010: http://blogs.technet.com/b/deploymentguys/archive/2010/03/22/mdt-debugger.aspx

The script I posted previously needed a few quick adjustments to enable proper logging to the “MININT” deployment directories. Here is the updated version. If you want to use it, give it a name starting with “Z” and drop it in the “Scripts” directory of your deployment share:


   
   

Option Explicit
RunNewInstance

'//—————————————————————————-
'//  Global Constants
'//—————————————————————————-

'//—————————————————————————-
'//  Main Class
'//—————————————————————————-

Class ZUVMsetTime

    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Global constant and variable declarations
    '//—————————————————————————-

    Dim iRetVal

    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Constructor to initialize needed global objects
    '//—————————————————————————-

    Private Sub Class_Initialize

    End Sub
    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Main routine
    '//—————————————————————————-

    Function Main

	' SetTime.vbs script
	' J. Greg Mackinnon, 2010-10-04
	' Actions: Syncs local system clock to "ntp.pool.org" time using the NTP protocol.
	'          Will change registry values for maximum time skew correction If necessary, Then revert to original values
	'          ReSets the w32time service during execution, but NOT at the End of the script.  An manual restart is required to 
	'            revert Domain-joined systems to defaults.
	' Requires: w32tm.exe, net.exe.  Both should be present on all Vista/Win7 systems.
	' Tested on: WinDows 7.  Should work on Vista as well... NOT intEnded for XP systems.

		Dim oExec
		Dim iPosRegVal, iNegRegVal
		Dim strKeyPath, strPosValueName, strNegValueName

		strKeyPath = "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\W32Time\Config"
		strPosValueName = "MaxPosPhaseCorrection"
		strNegValueName = "MaxNegPhaseCorrection"

		oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "Current Time is: " & Date & " " & Time, LogTypeInfo

		'This works, If you can understand the screwball interger value that gets returned.  
		'Everything over hex 0x0fffffff is listed as a negative interger.
		'0xffffffff returns -1.
		iPosRegVal = oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strPosValueName)
		iNegRegVal = oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strNegValueName)
		oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "strNegValueName value is: " & iNegRegVal, LogTypeInfo
		oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "StrPosValueName value is: " & iPosRegVal, LogTypeInfo

		If iPosRegVal  -1 Then
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "Maximum allowed clock skew correction is NOT large enough... Setting to maximum value."
			'Setting the Max Phase Correction registry values to "-1" (or 0xffffffff in hex), 
			'which will allow correction of local time by any amount.
			oShell.RegWrite strKeyPath & "\" & strPosValueName, -1, "REG_DWORD"
			oShell.RegWrite strKeyPath & "\" & strNegValueName, -1, "REG_DWORD"
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  strPosValueName & " is now Set to: " & oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strPosValueName), LogTypeInfo
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  strNegValueName & " is now Set to: " & oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strNegValueName), LogTypeInfo
		Else
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "This system already already is configured to allow large clock skew corrections.", LogTypeInfo
		End If 

		oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "Setting WinDows Time service Manual-sync NTP Server to ""pool.ntp.org""", LogTypeInfo
		' Pool.ntp.org is a collection of Internet NTP time servers.  
		' It is the default time source for stand-alone RedHat installs,
		' and apparently it is a but more reliable than "time.winDows.com"
		Set oExec = oShell.Exec("w32tm.exe /config /manualpeerlist:pool.ntp.org /update")
		Do While oExec.Status = 0
			 WScript.Sleep 100
		Loop
		Do While NOT oExec.StdOut.AtEndOfStream
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  oExec.StdOut.ReadLine, LogTypeInfo
		Loop

		'Stopping the w32time service.  
		'Necessary because changes to the w32time service will NOT take effect until service restart.
		Set oExec = oShell.Exec("net.exe stop w32time")
		Do While oExec.Status = 0
			 WScript.Sleep 100
		Loop
		Do While NOT oExec.StdOut.AtEndOfStream
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  oExec.StdOut.ReadLine, LogTypeInfo
		Loop

		'Starting the w32time service
		Set oExec = oShell.Exec("net start w32time")
		Do While oExec.Status = 0
			 WScript.Sleep 100
		Loop
		Do While NOT oExec.StdOut.AtEndOfStream
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  oExec.StdOut.ReadLine, LogTypeInfo
		Loop

		'Forcing a time service resync
		'Time would resync on its own soon enough, but we are impatient and want to see results immediately.
		Set oExec = oShell.Exec("w32tm.exe /resync")
		Do While oExec.Status = 0
			 WScript.Sleep 100
		Loop
		Do While NOT oExec.StdOut.AtEndOfStream
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  oExec.StdOut.ReadLine, LogTypeInfo
		Loop

		oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "Current Time is: " & Date & " " & Time, LogTypeInfo

		If iPosRegVal  -1 Then
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  "ReSetting registry maximum allowed clock skew correction Settings to their original values...", LogTypeInfo
			oShell.RegWrite strKeyPath & "\" & strPosValueName, iPosRegVal, "REG_DWORD"
			oShell.RegWrite strKeyPath & "\" & strNegValueName, iNegRegVal, "REG_DWORD"
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  strPosValueName & " is now Set to: " & oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strPosValueName), LogTypeInfo
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> " &  strNegValueName & " is now Set to: " & oShell.RegRead(strKeyPath & "\" & strNegValueName), LogTypeInfo
		End If
		
	End Function

End Class

   

But wait! This does not really work very… Time only gets fixed after the computer logs in after mini-setup completes. By this time, the initial Windows Activation attempt will have failed. Let’s take care of time synchronization in the WinPE environment, before we even lay down the Windows OS image. The following script is added as a custom action during the “pre-install” phase of LiteTouch deployment:


   
   

Option Explicit
RunNewInstance

'//—————————————————————————-
'//  Global Constants
'//—————————————————————————-

'const DEPLOY_SERVER = "\\sysimg3.campus.ad.uvm.edu"

'//—————————————————————————-
'//  Main Class
'//—————————————————————————-

Class ZUVMsetTimePE

    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Global constant and variable declarations
    '//—————————————————————————-
	
    Dim iRetVal

    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Constructor to initialize needed global objects
    '//—————————————————————————-

    Private Sub Class_Initialize
    End Sub
	
	Function RegExpFind(patrn, strng)
	  Dim regEx, oMatch, oMatches, iPos

	  ' Create the regular expression.
	  Set regEx = New RegExp
	  regEx.Pattern = patrn
	  regEx.IgnoreCase = False
	  regEx.Global = False

	  ' Do the search.
	  Set oMatches = regEx.Execute(strng)
	  
	  iPos = "0"
	  
	  For Each oMatch in oMatches
		iPos = oMatch.FirstIndex
	  Next
	  
	  RegExpFind = iPos
	End Function

    '//—————————————————————————-
    '//  Main routine
    '//—————————————————————————-

    Function Main
	
		' setTimePE.vbs
		' J. Greg Mackinnon, 2010-10-07
		' Sets time from within a WinPE 3.0 environment.
		
		Dim sDATESEARCH
		Dim sTIMESEARCH
		
		Dim oExec
		Dim sDSTime, sExecOut, sDate, sTime, sDateTime, sCmd, sDPServ
		Dim iPos1, iPos2, iLength
		
		sDATESEARCH = "[0-9]*/"
		sTIMESEARCH = "[0-9]*:"
		
		sDPServ = oEnvironment.Item("SMSDP")
		'sDPServ = "sysimg3.campus.ad.uvm.edu"

		oLogging.CreateEntry "Current Time on localhost is: " & Date & " " & Time, LogTypeInfo

		set oExec = oShell.Exec("net.exe time \\" & sDPServ)
		Do While oExec.Status = 0
			 WScript.Sleep 100
		Loop
		Do Until oExec.StdOut.AtEndOfStream
			sExecOut = oExec.StdOut.ReadLine
			oLogging.CreateEntry "setTime> Output from net time: " & sExecOut, LogTypeInfo
			iPos1 = RegExpFind(sDATESEARCH, sExecOut)
			If iPos1  0 then
				sDateTime = Mid(sExecOut,iPos1)
				iPos2 = RegExpFind(sTIMESEARCH, sDateTime)
				If  iPos2  0 then
					sTime = Mid(sDateTime, iPos2)
					sDate = Left(sDateTime, iPos2)
					Exit Do
				End If
			End If
		Loop

		oLogging.CreateEntry "Current Time on " & sDPServ & " is: " & sDateTime, LogTypeInfo


		REM set oExec = oShell.Exec("%comspec% /c time " & sTime)
		sCMD = """time " & sTime & """"
		oShell.Run "%comspec% /c " & sCMD

		sCMD = """date " & sDate & """"
		oShell.Run "%comspec% /c " & sCMD

		oLogging.CreateEntry "Current Time on localhost now is: " & Date & " " & Time, LogTypeInfo

	End Function

End Class