Miracast – the technology with 100 names

Some of us in ETS have been experimenting with wireless display technologies in the hopes of finding solutions that will work for those of us who don’t have an Apple client devices and an Apple TV.   (To those of you with Macs, we are indeed jealous.  AirPlay truly dominates the wireless display market at this time).

Much noise has been made of late concerning a technology called “Miracast”.  This is an open standard for wireless display.  It is built into the new Windows 8.1 OS, and Android 4.2 and later.  When you can get a functional receiver (we tested the NetGear Push2TV with some success) it is a pretty slick technology.  However, issues getting the required drivers and firmware in place can be quite frustrating and lead to failed deployments.  If you are working on a wireless display deployment, we would love to share notes with you to see if we can reach some configuration recommendations for the rest of campus.

In the interest of information sharing, here are some factoids that we discovered:

Miracast = The “Wi-Fi Alliance” marketing name for the rather boringly named “Wi-Fi Display” standard.

Miracast = Sony “screen mirroring” = Panasonic “display mirroring” =  Google “Wireless Display” = Samsung “AllShare Cast” = LG “SmartShare” = Intel “WiDi 3.5″
(e.g. Implementers of the Wi-Fi Display protocol don’t have to call it Miracast.  The question is, why would they want to call it something else?)

Miracast Intel WiDi versions prior to 3.5. AirPlay DIAL (ChromeCast) DLNA

(e.g. Intel WiDi has been replaced with a Miracast implementation, but maintains the name WiDi when deployed with support for back-level WiDi implementations.  Also, don’t confuse Miracast with ChromeCast (a DIAL implementation), AirPlay (an Apple technology), or DLNA (a media streaming solution.)

References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracast
http://www.theverge.com/2013/9/25/4753264/is-the-airplay-killer-already-dead

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