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On Thursday November 9, Miri Rubin (Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London), will lecture on “The Child Murder Accusation against the Jews of Norwich: Meaning, Memory and Legacy,” at 7:00 PM in Memorial Lounge (Waterman Bldg). The talk, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Carolyn and Leonard Miller Center for Holocaust Studies, with support from the Kinsler Endowment for Holocaust Studies at UVM and from the Department of History. It is also part of the CAS Medieval Studies Lecture Series.

This talk relates to Professor Rubin’s work as the editor and translator of Thomas of Monmouth’s The Life and Passion of William of Norwich (Penguin, 2014). This mid- twelfth-century text is generally regarded as the earliest accusation that Jews annually murdered a Christian child, the seed of what eventually became known as the “blood libel.” Professor Rubin will bring her unmatched erudition to an analysis of the meaning, memory and legacy of this “chilling, highly significant” text.

Calvin Trillin lecture

The UVM Department of History is excited to welcome our esteemed colleague, Mr. Calvin Trillin, to campus for his public lecture “The Writing Life” on Wednesday September 27 (5:00, Ira Allan Chapel).  It is true that Mr. Trillin’s brilliant credentials as a historian are often, and inexplicably, overlooked.  But within the field he is revered for such classics as “An Attempt to Compile a Short History of the Buffalo Chicken Wing” (which he figured, wrongly, would be “an easy task compared to, say, a medievalist whose specialty requires him to poke around in thirteenth-century Spain”), “A Very Short History of the Fish Taco,” and of course the methodological tour de force “An Attempt to Compile the Definitive History of Didee’s Restaurant” (“I might have given up the history game right there if it hadn’t been for the baked duck and dirty rice”).  Like all great historians, if somewhat more literally than most, Mr. Trillin evinces an inexhaustible appetite for the evidence.  The talk should be over in time for dinner.

Fall meet and greet!

The Department of History, along with Holocaust Studies, Romance Languages, English, Religion, Bailey-Howe Special Collections, and the CAS Dean’s Office, is delighted to sponsor the 2017-2018 College of Arts and Sciences Medieval Studies Lecture Series.

The Fall lineup welcomes to campus two stellar scholars:

First, on Wednesday October 4, Andrea Tarnowski (Associate Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Dartmouth College) will give a lecture entitled “On the Long Road of Learning with Christine de Pizan,” at 5:00, in Special Collections of Bailey-Howe Library.

Then, on Thursday November 9, Miri Rubin (Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London), will lecture on “The Child Murder Accusation against the Jews of Norwich: Meaning, Memory and Legacy,” at 7:00 PM in Memorial Lounge (Waterman Bldg). This talk is sponsored by the Carolyn and Leonard Miller Center for Holocaust Studies.

Both talks are free and open to the public.  For more information, e-mail Professor Sean Field at sean.field@uvm.edu.

Please join us next week for the opening reception of “Contesting Race and Citizenship in the Gilded Age,” an exhibit of political cartoons assembled by students in Professor Nicole Phelps’ TAP seminar on the Gilded Age, at Bailey-Howe Library.

Not even a foot of snow can stop a great medieval historian!  Dr. Jacques Dalarun arrived safe and sound from Paris, and the UVM Department of History is proud to present his public lecture today at 5:00 as scheduled!

Monday, February 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM – 338 Waterman Building, Memorial Lounge

Dr. Jacques Dalarun (IRHT/CNRS, Paris) will give a public lecture on “The ‘Rediscovered Francis of Assisi’ in the Rediscovered Life by Thomas of Celano.” The lecture is sponsored by the Department of History and the College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, and is part of the College of Arts and Sciences 2016-2017 Medieval Studies Lecture Series.  For more information, please contact Prof. Sean Field at sean.field@uvm.edu

If you find the idea of mysterious medieval manuscripts intriguing, the Department of History and the College of Arts and Sciences Medieval Studies Lecture Series has a treat for you—two lectures in the next week by two world authorities on two fascinating manuscripts!  These lectures are free and open to all.
 
Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 6:00 PM, Special Collections, Bailey Howe Library
Dr. Ray Clemens (Curator of Early Books & Manuscripts at Yale University’s Beinecke Library) will give a public lecture entitled, “The World’s Most Mysterious Manuscript: Theories on Its Origin and Use”.    This is a manuscript held at Yale written in a code so fiendishly difficult that it has never been deciphered!  For more information, please contact Prof. Charles Briggs at charles.briggs@uvm.edu

Monday, February 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM – 338 Waterman Building, Memorial Lounge
Dr. Jacques Dalarun (IRHT/CNRS, Paris) will give a public lecture on “The ‘Rediscovered Francis of Assisi’ in the Rediscovered Life by Thomas of Celano.”  The lecture focuses on Dr. Dalarun’s discovery of a previously unknown life of St. Francis in a manuscript that had been  lost for over 700 years, and will be preceded by a brief introduction from UVM Prof. of History Sean Field.  For more information, please contact Prof. Field at sean.field@uvm.edu

“What the US Stands to Lose in Alienating its Muslim and Mexican Allies”

Panel discussion featuring Leslie Holman (Burlington-based immigration lawyer) along with Caroline Beer (Political Science), Peter Henne (Political Science), Ilyse Morgenstein-Furst (Religion), Sarah Osten (History)
Tuesday, February 7th 4-5:30 pm
Mildred Livak Ballroom, 4th Floor, Davis Center

This interdisciplinary panel will consider the many potential ramifications of the Trump administration’s new immigration and refugee policies. Thus far particularly targeting Mexico and numerous Muslim majority countries, these policies have likely undermined longstanding US alliances and long-term diplomatic efforts.  Burlington-based immigration lawyer Leslie Holman will discuss her field legal experiences with refugees and work negotiating with US immigration processes, both before and after the recent travel restrictions. Faculty members from UVM will explore the recent executive order restricting migration, focusing on the broader implications of recent diplomatic maneuvers by the White House and identifying risks for our country that come along with them.

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