Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

iPad App: inkling

Inkling, a new app and textbook producer, was mentioned recently in the Wired Campus blog from The Chronicle of Higher Education. (Kaya, Travis. “Classroom iPad Programs Get Mixed Response” Sept. 20, 1010) What is it? An app for buying, reading, and annotating textbooks which includes searching, highlighting, notetaking, and the ability to share those notes […]

Read Full Post »

Wichada Sukantarat of the UVM Library asked Alison Armstrong, Scott Scaheffer and me to put together a panel discussion for the library staff on eBook and eReaders. I was asked to talk about the technical issues, Alison about library service issues,  and Scott about legal issues. In the course of the discussion we and the […]

Read Full Post »

According to Daniel Paul O’Donnell, “Humanities, Not Science, Key to New Web Frontier.” Citing the humanities background of several familiar web creators (Larry Sanger/Wikipedia, Mark Zuckerberg/Facebook, Michael Everson/Unicode), O’Donnell asserts that: “The Internet is no longer primarily an engineering problem. Its basic technological building blocks have been in place for 20 years. What is new […]

Read Full Post »

Held Monday, February 01, 2010http://www.nercomp.org/events/event_single.aspx?id=5932 This was, far and away, the best NERCOMP event I have attended. The notes are both extensive and cryptic but I wanted to keep it all. 1) Digital Scholarship in the Humanities: Challenges and Opportunities Patrick Yott, Director, Center for Digital Scholarship, Brown University2) Digital Humanities From a Liberal Arts […]

Read Full Post »

The publishing world continues to buzz about upcoming reading devices and the business models that will best exploit them. E Ink, the company that makes the electronic “paper” used in devices like the Kindle, is still a black-and-white-only technology. However, Plastic Logic will be piloting their larger reading device later this year with expected sales […]

Read Full Post »

A couple weeks ago Dan Cohen decided to try a live Twitter experiment in crowdsourcing during his live presentation at a conference. The experiment is described in his blog post summary. was to use Twitter to “replicate digitally the traditional “author’s query,” where a scholar asks readers of a journal for assistance with a research […]

Read Full Post »

What do students

Mary W. George (“Admissions of Another Sort” April 13, 2009) ponders the student library research experience and wonders: “If there is a discrepancy between pedagogical intent and actual student research behavior, how do faculty members address it?” Here are several statements she has encountered from students. Read the engaging article for her speculations on the […]

Read Full Post »

Just published: a report, including several papers, from the September 2008 symposium held by the Council on Library and Information Resources and the National Endowment for the Humanities, titled: “Working Together of Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship“ The purpose of the symposium was to explore the intersections between the humanities, social sciences, […]

Read Full Post »

LOC and YouTube

First it was Flickr, now its YouTube. Hoorah for the Library of Congress as they begin to place portions of their vast video holdings on the popular site. First collections include the 2008 National Book Festival author presentations, the Books and Beyond author series, “Westinghouse” industrial films from 1904, scholar discussions from the John W. […]

Read Full Post »

NYTimes has two articles today related to eBooks and electronic writing. (Brad Stone “Is This the Future of the Digital Book?” and Randall Stross “Small Company Offers Web-Based Competition for Microsoft Word“). I pair them together because they both describe ways in which current web-based media are nibbling at the edges of the reading and […]

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »