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Archive for November, 2007

It’s always fun to twine together threads about the future of reading.The introduction of Kindle has occurred at about the same time as the announcement of yet another study on the reading habits, or lack thereof, of US citizens. So, for fun, compare: 1) The Right to Read, by Richard Stallman http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html “For Dan Halbert, […]

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A new group (on Yahoo, which at this time seems a bit quaint) has been added to the pantheon of places to discuss digitization and e-texts. The specific topic of this group, according to its creator Jon Noring, is “for serious, in-depth discussion and information exchange, technical and non-technical, of the digitization of “paper” publications, […]

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The discussion over Google Library continues to be intriguing. Is it a scholars dream come true or a nightmare of selling out to corporate? This week Paul Courant, Dean of Libraries at the University of Michigan, wades into the fray with a posting on his new blog. Titled “On Being in Bed With Google” he […]

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TEI@20: Day 3

Day 3 began with a wonderful talk by Melissa Terras (UC London) on the need for better TEI education. She also introduced the TEI by Example project, which is working on, to quote the website, the creation and on-line delivery of a TEI by example course for teaching TEI in higher education and workshops the […]

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TEI@20: Day 2

Day 2 began, after introductions and welcomes, with the opening plenary session by B. Tommie Usdin (Mulberry Technologies) and chair of Balisage (aka the annual Extreme Markup conference). After praising the work of the TEI, Tommie had some pointed and, I believe, very timely comments on the need for the TEI to grow through better […]

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TEI Meeting: Day 1 Recap This week I’m attending the Text Encoding Initiative‘s annual meeting (TEI@20). The TEI is, at heart, a scholarly effort to develop a tag-set for encoding, or marking up, documents in the humanities. Documents in this case are quite broadly defined to include books, manuscripts, music, even physical objects like gravestones. […]

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