Tag Archives: WindowsServer

Monday – June 1

It’s June! Cold and rainy?! Gah!!

On the list for today:

  • AD Domain Services on Server 2008 and Operations Manager 2007

Operations Manager — verifying current version

Post regarding installing hotfixes on the Management Server using SetupUpdateOM.exe. Never heard of it before. Doesn’t exist on my system. Perhaps it’s part of OPs Mgr 2007 R2?

I decided that the KB956184 patch looked the most promising. Because the installation involved manual replacement of msi files in the AgentManagement folder on the Root Management Server, I could back-out the changes if things went South.

After renaming the original 64-bit OOMADs.msi files and replacing them (AMD64 and IA64 versions) with the ones from the hotfix. Then I used the OpsMgr console to uninstall the agent from my four Windows server 2008 AMD64 domain controllers, one at a time. For each I verified that the new AD MP Helper Object was installed, checking appwiz and Program Files\Common. Then I checked the Operations Manager Event Log. This time, there were no errors running the DSDiscovery script. Health explorer on each DC is now clean. Yes!!!

The only lingering issue is the presence of five errors in the event logs on each DC, complaining about the inability to locate Performance Counters for DirectoryServices: “DS Search sub-operations/sec”, “LDAP Client Sessions”, “LDAP Searches/sec”, “LDAP UDP operations/sec”, and “LDAP Writes/sec”. I verified that I could see these counters within Performance Monitor on the DC. This thread in the OpsMgr Management Pack newsgroup seems germane, though the Live login isn’t working for me at the moment.

Managed to chime in on that thread. We’ll see if anything useful comes of it.

Opsmgr Friday

Having successfully deployed some agents to some recalcitrant hosts, I’m now trying to address a false positive issue on a DC. I’m getting an error regarding “AD Op Master Respone [sic] Monitor”. The host has a recurring error:

AD Op Master Response : The script ‘AD Op Master Response’ failed to create object ‘McActiveDir.ActiveDirectory’.  This is an unexpected error.
The error returned was: ‘ActiveX component can’t create object’ (0x1AD)

This led me to a blog post suggesting that the AD Helper Object needed to be installed. So I look in the OpsMgr host’s AgentManagement location and find the msi. When I tried to install that msi package, I received an error that the “this installation package is not supported by this processor type.” The host is running AMD64 Windows, and the file came from the AMD64 part of the AgentManagement tree.

I checked the list of installed apps on another x64 DC, and saw that the “System CenterManagement Pack Helper Objects” item had been installed. So I tried repairing the agent install from within Ops Manager. Error persists.

Checking the hotfixes required to make Ops Manager agent work on Server 2008, and they are missing. Stay tuned

UPDATE:

Applied the hotfixes and still no love. I did dig into the eventlog, and saw that it appear the ADDiscover script failed in some way. I tried running the script manually (using the arguments from the eventlog entry), but it still failed. I fell back to google and found the following promising KB article: Alerts are issued from the MOM Active Directory Management Pack after you install an Operations Manager 2007 SP1 agent over a MOM 2005 agent on a domain controller that is running a 64-bit version of Windows.

Now this KB article describes a set of circumstances that don’t match my situation. I didn’t install MOM 2005 agent and then the OpsMgr 2007 agent on the same host. This system was built from the ground up with server 2008 x64 and Operations Manager 2007 was deployed here way before server 2008. However, the constellation of symptoms and architecture issues make it sound interesting.

Just found Kevin Holman’s blog and his list of hotfixes. I must go read about these and OpsMgr SP2 before doing anything drastic. Nothing like breaking the server late on a Friday.

Tuesday – May 5

Spurred by some recent traffic on the Windows-HiEd list, I have looked into the Windows Update process on some of our Server 2008 Core systems. The thread was specifically with regard to KB article 953631, and that some folks have found that it installs repeatedly on Server Core instances and blocks other updates.

In examining the event logs on a couple of our Server Core system, I found that the update is indeed re-installing repeatedly, but it doesn’t appear to be blocking other updates.

First, I ran the systeminfo command to display the installed updates. KB953631 was not listed. I grabbed the WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs script from Microsoft (I renamed it to Get-WindowsUpdates.vbs, in keeping with the sound PowerShell naming conventions). When I ran the script, it found and downloaded two updates, the KB953631 update in question, and KB955430. I confirmed that I wanted the updates installed, and the first update installed successfully, but the second failed (my initial searches didn’t explain the 0x800f082f error code). I reproduced the same behavior on another server core instance.

I tried rebooting the host, and running the Get-WindowsUpdates.vbs script again, and this time both updates installed successfully. (yes, the KB953631 update installed again). I reproduced this success on the other host as well.

So it appears that in our environment, the KB953631 update isn’t blocking other updates. I’ll confirm this after Patch Tuesday.

At the very end of the KB article is the following:

Note for WSUS administrators
If you approve this update for deployment in a WSUS environment, be aware that after you run the update, it will not be reported as "Installed." The update itself is not installed on client computers. The update scans for missing files and replaces them as appropriate. If a computer requires a missing file, the 953631 update will be reported as "Needed.”

Also, Server Core is not mentioned specifically in the list of affected operating systems. It might be worth asking what the expected correct behavior should be in this situation.

In my investigating, I also found an article in the Scripting Center the describes a PowerShell approach to manipulating Windows Updates. This might be nice when Server 2008 R2 is availabel and .NET and PowerShell are included, or other update-wrangling tasks.