Category Archives: Learning

Knowing Thyself Gets a Hand from Exam Wrappers

Most of us can identify with the chagrin students feel when they earn a grade that they’re not happy about. But, as with most of life’s stings, the disappointment comes with a learning opportunity. An exam wrapper (or assignment or project wrapper) can help students understand what happened and what they can do to improve their learning. A […]

Hone Your Skills with Lynda.com

Brief intro by Lynda, herself If you’ve heard of Lynda.com, you’ll probably be very happy to know that UVM now has a full subscription to the service! Lynda.com began in 1995 and has since grown to be one of the world’s leading providers of online trainings for creative, business, software, and technology skills. On the topic […]

Using Collaborative Learning Experiences to Support Student Success

This post is contributed by Dr. Ellen McShane, Director of Academic Success Programs at UVM. Author George D. Kuh (2008) has identified collaborative learning experiences as a “high-impact practice” that allows students to succeed in college. Collaborative learning experiences can include study groups in courses, team-based course assignments, peer tutoring, and cooperative learning projects that […]

Michael Wesch’s Latest Work

According to Dr. Michael Wesch, his new website, myteachingnotebook.com, focuses on “the pursuit of joy in teaching and learning.” I first saw it in August and made a note to myself to share it here in mid-semester, when the geese are flying south and we aren’t sure if it’s getting colder and darker or just […]

Exploring Contemplative Practices in Higher Education

This fall, the CTL sponsored a book group exploring contemplative teaching/learning methods. The book, Contemplative Practices in Higher Education: Powerful Methods to Transform Teaching and Learning (Barbezat and Bush, 2013), describes a pedagogy that is based on long-established meditative practices and cites research indicating its effectiveness. The authors explore contemplative teaching practices’ potential to: Deepen […]

Getting Students in Gear for Learning

I wrote this post a couple of years ago and I want to share it again because the resources are so valuable. Getting students in gear for learning is really about preparing students to become active agents in their own learning—both engaged in and accountable for the process. As with creating courses, the course objectives […]

Announcing Two Workshops in Support of BlackBoard Jungle 7

Blackboard Jungle 7 kicked off this week with a keynote by Charlayne Hunter-Gault on Monday and continues this Friday, March 28th, with a day of workshops and presentations. (See schedule) In support of Blackboard Jungle, the CTL is offering two workshops in collaboration with Writing in the Disciplines.   They’ll take place on April 4th […]

Task Management & Setting Priorities for Projects – Large and Small

It often feels like there are not enough hours in our days to get everything done. To make life a bit more manageable, we need some system(s) and process(es) to help take the stress out of the workload. Here are a few ways to help you manage your projects, large and small, and ultimately allow […]

Student Engagement Tip: Sequence Matters

The recency and primacy effects—long documented phenomena related to the importance of sequence on information recall—evidence that, in short, “Following a single exposure to learning, recall is better for items at the beginning (primacy) and end (recency) […] than for middle items.” [1] This is relevant to teaching and learning because it’s in that middle […]

MOOCs

MOOCs are courses that are: Massive: designed for large-scale participation by dozens or even thousands of people. Open: freely available with free access to all course materials. Online: available through any web browser on any mobile device or computer. As the MOOC model has gained acceptance it continues to be redefined and changed to suit […]

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