The phenotype and evolution (more on defining evolution)

In the previous post I made it clear that I was defining evolution in terms of changes in phenotype.  This is an important point, as many only consider changes in gene frequency to be evidence of evolution.  As an example, in a recent article in the scientist (http://www.the-scientist.com//?articles.view/articleNo/35317/title/Humans-Under-Pressure/) the author writes: “Although the team did […]

Defining Evolution

One of the unusual things about books about evolution is how frequently they fail to actually define evolution.  Typically such books will have several pages describing evolution, so that by the time you have finished reading the section you have a pretty good idea of what they are talking about.  But generally speaking if after […]

Introduction to this blog

I started studying evolution when I entered graduate school over 35 years ago.  Since that time I have found that my views on evolution are often at odds with those of other often very outspoken evolutionists.  I also find that my views tend to be in line with the work-a-day evolutionists.  In other words, the […]