Archive for October, 2016

Digital Map Photo

Posted in Uncategorized on October 24, 2016 by bgluhosk

Birdseye View

Posted in Uncategorized on October 24, 2016 by bgluhosk

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This is a view of my place as seen from above. The black strip is the nearby road. The green is patches of or stand alone trees and the brown is the ground. The ground is brown because it is covered in dead needles, not vegetation.

Wildlife Habitat

Posted in Uncategorized on October 24, 2016 by bgluhosk

There are many openings in the bottom of several of the Eastern White Pine trees. While I did not see any animals in them it is quite possible that some small rodents use them for food storage or sleep space.

Any Change to the Vegetation?

Posted in Uncategorized on October 24, 2016 by bgluhosk

Since my location is largely composed of Eastern White Pines, which are a type of evergreen tree, there was no noticeable change in the vegetation. These trees will maintain the same appearance year round because they lose their needles continuously.

Welcome to my blog!

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

My name is Ben and I am a first year student majoring in wildlife biology within the Rubenstein School at UVM. I created this blog for my NR 1 (Natural History and Field Ecology) course. The purpose of this assignment is to study the landscape and organisms within a specific place throughout the seasons (place-based phenology). I hope that my blog persuades some of you to visit my location, Ethan Allen Park, or at the very least explore and observe an area near your home.

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

I believe this oddity is called a burl. A burl results from some sort of stress for example; injury or a viral or fungal infection.

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My Place on a Map

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1p8oOxQSxYdNjBsqn2xYPII62sv0&usp=sharing

Here Are a Few More Photos of My Place

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

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The photo on top is an image of an Eastern White Pine. The other two images depict the area in which my place is located within Ethan Allen Park.

The Plant Life

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

Other than trees, there is little to no vegetation within my area. This is most likely caused by the large accumulation of pine needles on the ground. Pine needles are quite acidic and the significant amount on the ground most likely created an environment too acidic for the majority of native plant growth. Now as I’ve already mentioned, the predominant tree species in my place is the Eastern White Pine. Eastern White Pines grow to be very straight and tall. The needles are in bundles of five and are long, slender, and flexible. They have large cones, usually 4-7in. with round tough scales that are sometimes covered in sap. Young trees have smooth gray-green bark while mature trees have extremely ridged bark with grayish-red scales. In the middle of all of the Eastern White Pines stands a solitary Black Locust tree. Black locust trees are dark gray-brown and tinged with red or orange in the grooves. They are deeply furrowed and the ridges often cross to form diamond shapes. The leaves are compound which means that the leaf contains many smaller leaf-like structures called leaflets. Pictured below is the bark and a leaf of the black locust. The individual leaf-like parts you see are leaflets, not leaves.

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How to Get to Ethan Allen Park

Posted in Uncategorized on October 17, 2016 by bgluhosk

Hours of Operation:

5am-sunset

There is parking if you are able to drive yourself

For anyone without a car, the CCTA buses are your next best option. First, board bus number 7 (North Avenue), preferably one driving away from downtown Burlington. Now this is the part where you have to pay attention. You want to get off at the stop that is next to Rite Aid on North Ave (near Village Green). This is after Burlington High School and a little before Ethan Allen Shopping Center. You will have to pull the yellow cord or push the black tape because the bus will not stop if you don’t. Once you are off the bus, walk around the back side of Rite Aid toward Ethan Allen Parkway. Ethan Allen Park is located on the opposite side of Rite Aid. After crossing the street, continue to walk towards and past the playground (north) until you get to a patch of tall coniferous trees. Congratulations! You found my place.

On a side note, there are no restrooms in the park so I strongly advise taking care of business before hand!

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