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Posts Tagged ‘books’

… And what I’m reading

Some books I’ve recently received and/or am currently reading… If you’d like to review any of them for this blog, let me know. And if there are others published in the last year that should be on this list, let me know that too (in the comments).

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Both Open Culture and The New York Times have reported on the Open Syllabus Project, which has tallied over a million college course syllabi to determine the 10,000 or so most commonly assigned texts. The project also provides a cluster map of these texts, which is probably less interesting (and more confusing) in its large form than when one pokes […]

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Bandwagocene

These days, it takes a course release for an academic to keep up with the avalanche of books being published with titles that feature the word “Anthropocene.” To read them would take a sabbatical. Doing anything approximating a “slow read” would require, well, retirement. But that’s no reason not to try. Here’s just a quick sample […]

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It seems that my first book, Claiming Sacred Ground, which came out ten years ago, is circulating for free online as a PDF. (I just downloaded it myself to see if it’s the real thing; it is. Do a PDF search for it if you want it.) I don’t mind people downloading it — it’s […]

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A new book by Tim Ingold is always good news, especially one that — like his 2000 collection Perception of the Environment — brings together several years’ worth of work into one volume. Ingold describes Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description as “in many ways” a “sequel” to that earlier book, and it’s […]

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What books, published over the last ten years, have contributed most cogently and profoundly to our thinking about the relationship between culture and nature, ecology and society? (That’s to name just two of the dualisms this blog regularly throws into question.) Who have been the most important ecocultural theorists so far this century? And which […]

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